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Population Change in the United States: Implications of an Aging and Diversifying Population for Health Care in the 21st Century

Population Change in the United States: Implications of an Aging and Diversifying Population for... CHAPTER 3 Population Change in the United States Implications of an Aging and Diversifying Population for Health Care in the 21st Century Steve H. Murdock, Md. Nazrul Hoque, and Mary McGehee Few demographic events have received the amount of popular and professional attention as the aging of the population of the United States (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1996; Manton, 2001) and that in populations in other nations in the world (United Nations, 2003; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2004a). The aging of the baby-boom generation (Hayward & Zhang, 2001; Freedman, 1999; Morgan, 1998; Dychtwald, 1996) is expected to result in projected increases in demands on social security (Bennett & Olshansky, 1996; Feldstein, 1998), Medicare (Miller, 2001; Cooper, 1999), health care (Marshall, 2001; Feder, Komisar, & Niefeld, 2001; Binstock, 1993), and long-term care (Wolf, 2001; Manton, 2001; Manton Stallard, 1996; Kingston, 1996; Zedlewski & McBride, 1992). Such analyses have examined the biological (Olshansky & Carnes, 2001), social (Quadagno, 2005), and economic (Serow, 2001) dimensions of the aging population, and all point to the increased health care demands and costs associated with such aging. What often receives less attention is that this aging of the population is only one of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Population Change in the United States: Implications of an Aging and Diversifying Population for Health Care in the 21st Century

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.19
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 3 Population Change in the United States Implications of an Aging and Diversifying Population for Health Care in the 21st Century Steve H. Murdock, Md. Nazrul Hoque, and Mary McGehee Few demographic events have received the amount of popular and professional attention as the aging of the population of the United States (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1996; Manton, 2001) and that in populations in other nations in the world (United Nations, 2003; U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2004a). The aging of the baby-boom generation (Hayward & Zhang, 2001; Freedman, 1999; Morgan, 1998; Dychtwald, 1996) is expected to result in projected increases in demands on social security (Bennett & Olshansky, 1996; Feldstein, 1998), Medicare (Miller, 2001; Cooper, 1999), health care (Marshall, 2001; Feder, Komisar, & Niefeld, 2001; Binstock, 1993), and long-term care (Wolf, 2001; Manton, 2001; Manton Stallard, 1996; Kingston, 1996; Zedlewski & McBride, 1992). Such analyses have examined the biological (Olshansky & Carnes, 2001), social (Quadagno, 2005), and economic (Serow, 2001) dimensions of the aging population, and all point to the increased health care demands and costs associated with such aging. What often receives less attention is that this aging of the population is only one of

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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