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Order Out of Chaos: John Shaw Billings and America’s Coming of Age

Order Out of Chaos: John Shaw Billings and America’s Coming of Age I66 Book Rcvicws types of physical activi ywomen pursued from youth to old age. In portraying these mrat pmascs as inherently harmful and mumatic ocammm requiring d medid regulation, pI@& echoed thc 'tReakff sex'' argument of biological determiniscswhdc reinforcing their own professional position as the ultimate authority in matters concerning women's overall well-being. Part Two presents the responses of women physicians to male medical models offemale health and fitness. The views of well-known medical pioneers Elizabeth Bladrwell, Elizabeth Garrett Andmn, Sophia Jex-Blake, and Mary Putnam jacobi are contrast& with the conservative vim of ArabeUa Kencaly, Elizabeth SIoan Chessct, and Angenettc Pacry. Nurse historians will discover but a passing reference to Florence Nightingale and a brief paragraph concern- ing the perceived differen= between medicine and nursing as mcer options for mmcn in this section. Bart Three focuses on rhe writings of psychologist and eugenicist G. Sdey Hall and feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gihm as examples of the volatile, polar interpretations of rhe issue of women's and intellectual capabilities at the turn of the century. The Eternal4 Wounhd Womn is a valuable addition to women's history. It is as much an examination of medicine as a powerfuI form of sodd control http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Order Out of Chaos: John Shaw Billings and America’s Coming of Age

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.166
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I66 Book Rcvicws types of physical activi ywomen pursued from youth to old age. In portraying these mrat pmascs as inherently harmful and mumatic ocammm requiring d medid regulation, pI@& echoed thc 'tReakff sex'' argument of biological determiniscswhdc reinforcing their own professional position as the ultimate authority in matters concerning women's overall well-being. Part Two presents the responses of women physicians to male medical models offemale health and fitness. The views of well-known medical pioneers Elizabeth Bladrwell, Elizabeth Garrett Andmn, Sophia Jex-Blake, and Mary Putnam jacobi are contrast& with the conservative vim of ArabeUa Kencaly, Elizabeth SIoan Chessct, and Angenettc Pacry. Nurse historians will discover but a passing reference to Florence Nightingale and a brief paragraph concern- ing the perceived differen= between medicine and nursing as mcer options for mmcn in this section. Bart Three focuses on rhe writings of psychologist and eugenicist G. Sdey Hall and feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gihm as examples of the volatile, polar interpretations of rhe issue of women's and intellectual capabilities at the turn of the century. The Eternal4 Wounhd Womn is a valuable addition to women's history. It is as much an examination of medicine as a powerfuI form of sodd control

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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