Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Nursing Uniforms: Romantic Idea, Functional Attire, or Instrument of Social Change?

Nursing Uniforms: Romantic Idea, Functional Attire, or Instrument of Social Change? Nursing Uniforms: Romantic Idea, Functional Attire, or Instrument of Social Change? IRENE SCHUESSLER POPLI N Division ofNursing Midwestern State University The history of modem secular nursing uniforms, which identify a female wearer as belonging to the nursing profession, originated with Theodor and Friedericke Fliedncr, who in 1836 founded the Kaiserswerth Deaconess Institute's Nurse Training School. The Fliedners had a vision that they hoped to translate into a practical reality. They saw standard uniform at­ tire as fundamental to the new, modern nursing occupation because the nurse had to have a respectable and competent outward appearance, both as an individual and as a member of a respected occupational group. Their views differed from conceptions of nursing held by Florence Night­ ingale and her contemporaries, for whom uniforms were not an issue but a mere practical matter. But, in early nineteenth-century Prussia, later to become Germany, where the Fliedners labored to gain recognition and social respectability for the new nursing, attire was a matter of vi­ tal importance. Without uniforms signaling respectability in a very class­ strUctured, rigidly controlled, authoritarian society, nursing could not have succeeded. Respectable women could not have overcome the loathsome reputation associated with the «derelicts" hired to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Nursing Uniforms: Romantic Idea, Functional Attire, or Instrument of Social Change?

Nursing History Review , Volume 2 (1): 15 – Jan 1, 1994

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/nursing-uniforms-romantic-idea-functional-attire-or-instrument-of-XZXBW9Yt1h
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.153
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nursing Uniforms: Romantic Idea, Functional Attire, or Instrument of Social Change? IRENE SCHUESSLER POPLI N Division ofNursing Midwestern State University The history of modem secular nursing uniforms, which identify a female wearer as belonging to the nursing profession, originated with Theodor and Friedericke Fliedncr, who in 1836 founded the Kaiserswerth Deaconess Institute's Nurse Training School. The Fliedners had a vision that they hoped to translate into a practical reality. They saw standard uniform at­ tire as fundamental to the new, modern nursing occupation because the nurse had to have a respectable and competent outward appearance, both as an individual and as a member of a respected occupational group. Their views differed from conceptions of nursing held by Florence Night­ ingale and her contemporaries, for whom uniforms were not an issue but a mere practical matter. But, in early nineteenth-century Prussia, later to become Germany, where the Fliedners labored to gain recognition and social respectability for the new nursing, attire was a matter of vi­ tal importance. Without uniforms signaling respectability in a very class­ strUctured, rigidly controlled, authoritarian society, nursing could not have succeeded. Respectable women could not have overcome the loathsome reputation associated with the «derelicts" hired to

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.