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Nursing: Its Principles and Practice: For Hospital and Private Use

Nursing: Its Principles and Practice: For Hospital and Private Use k0k RCV&S 171 Ftrguson's narrative is the reason for the separation of type of disability; that is, why were the retarded separated From the mentally ill? Ferguson makes the interesting point that there were more insane people than retarded individuals admitted to qlums. While he does provide an interesting explanation for this phenomenon, ie is undcar whether the fate of the retarded was any worse than that of the insane. Ferguson labels the type of change that h occwod in the history of mend retardation as involutionaty. An involutionaty pattern of change is one where tfiings become 'more elaborately the same" (p. 1 57). There arc some noticeable weahem in Ferguson's account, For cx- ample, he points out that more retarded people were kept at home than were instirutio~lalized; he labels this type of care as abandonment. He provides the reader no data, however, to support that judgmmt. He dm fails to prwide rhc reader a dear understanding of what daily life was like for the institutionalized retarded patient. The book is well written and the author's use of primary sources is impressive. Alrhough most readers of medical and nursing history will be familiar with some aspects of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Nursing: Its Principles and Practice: For Hospital and Private Use

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

k0k RCV&S 171 Ftrguson's narrative is the reason for the separation of type of disability; that is, why were the retarded separated From the mentally ill? Ferguson makes the interesting point that there were more insane people than retarded individuals admitted to qlums. While he does provide an interesting explanation for this phenomenon, ie is undcar whether the fate of the retarded was any worse than that of the insane. Ferguson labels the type of change that h occwod in the history of mend retardation as involutionaty. An involutionaty pattern of change is one where tfiings become 'more elaborately the same" (p. 1 57). There arc some noticeable weahem in Ferguson's account, For cx- ample, he points out that more retarded people were kept at home than were instirutio~lalized; he labels this type of care as abandonment. He provides the reader no data, however, to support that judgmmt. He dm fails to prwide rhc reader a dear understanding of what daily life was like for the institutionalized retarded patient. The book is well written and the author's use of primary sources is impressive. Alrhough most readers of medical and nursing history will be familiar with some aspects of this

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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