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Nursing and the “New Style of Life”: Trained Nursing in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1898–1961

Nursing and the “New Style of Life”: Trained Nursing in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1898–1961 NURSING IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN Nursing and the “New Style of Life”: Trained Nursing in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1898–1961 Winifred Connerton Pace University College of Health Professions The Spanish-American War was, on the surface, a war to free the Cuban r - evo lutionaries from the harsh governance of Spain. The result of the conflict was that the United States acquired Spain’s colonies of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guam and paid Spain outright for the Philippines. The sudden acquisition of extracontinental territories was unanticipated, and their management was the source of conflict between imperialists, who saw the territories as potential markets and sources of raw materials, and the anti-imperialists, who argued that a democratic nation had no business holding other countries as colonies, or alternately that the peoples of these nations would dilute the Anglo-Saxon majority and thus weaken the nation. Despite these debates, it was clear from the beginning that the newly acquired territories would not be incorporated into the United States as potential new states, but rather be territories destined for eventual independence. In each of the newly occupied territories, the preparation for self-rule involved an Americanization campaign designed to prepare the populace for a participatory democracy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Nursing and the “New Style of Life”: Trained Nursing in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1898–1961

Nursing History Review , Volume 26 (1): 5 – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.26.1.111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NURSING IN THE SPANISH-SPEAKING CARIBBEAN Nursing and the “New Style of Life”: Trained Nursing in the Spanish-Speaking Caribbean, 1898–1961 Winifred Connerton Pace University College of Health Professions The Spanish-American War was, on the surface, a war to free the Cuban r - evo lutionaries from the harsh governance of Spain. The result of the conflict was that the United States acquired Spain’s colonies of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guam and paid Spain outright for the Philippines. The sudden acquisition of extracontinental territories was unanticipated, and their management was the source of conflict between imperialists, who saw the territories as potential markets and sources of raw materials, and the anti-imperialists, who argued that a democratic nation had no business holding other countries as colonies, or alternately that the peoples of these nations would dilute the Anglo-Saxon majority and thus weaken the nation. Despite these debates, it was clear from the beginning that the newly acquired territories would not be incorporated into the United States as potential new states, but rather be territories destined for eventual independence. In each of the newly occupied territories, the preparation for self-rule involved an Americanization campaign designed to prepare the populace for a participatory democracy

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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