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My Questionable Status as a Friendly Enemy Alien: British Responses to Jewish Refugee Nurses 1933 to 1948

My Questionable Status as a Friendly Enemy Alien: British Responses to Jewish Refugee Nurses 1933... My Questionable Status as a Friendly Enemy Alien: British Responses to Jewish Refugee Nurses 1933 to 1948 Jane Brooks University of Manchester Introduction Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany on March 23, 1933. His National Socialist Party was brutally anti-Semitic. Historian and Holocaust survivor Saul Friedlander argues that in the early months Hitler’s main antag- onism was toward the communists and not the Jews. But by 1934, Jews were beginning to realize that they might not have a future in Germany Ov.er the next five years, hundreds of thousands of Jews tried to escape increasingly certain death. The vast majority tried in vain; however, some Jews managed to escape to the United Kingdom. Although Britain was only marginally less hos- tile to Jewish refugees than other countries around the world, it did offer the chance of safety to ten thousand Jewish children through the Kindertransport program; it also offered refuge for Jewish women who were willing to work in other people’s houses or as hospital nurses. This article focuses on the lives of Jewish women refugees who entered the nursing profession. Despite severe nursing shortages as Britain faced the threat of war, the employment of Jewish women as nurses http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

My Questionable Status as a Friendly Enemy Alien: British Responses to Jewish Refugee Nurses 1933 to 1948

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 21 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

My Questionable Status as a Friendly Enemy Alien: British Responses to Jewish Refugee Nurses 1933 to 1948 Jane Brooks University of Manchester Introduction Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany on March 23, 1933. His National Socialist Party was brutally anti-Semitic. Historian and Holocaust survivor Saul Friedlander argues that in the early months Hitler’s main antag- onism was toward the communists and not the Jews. But by 1934, Jews were beginning to realize that they might not have a future in Germany Ov.er the next five years, hundreds of thousands of Jews tried to escape increasingly certain death. The vast majority tried in vain; however, some Jews managed to escape to the United Kingdom. Although Britain was only marginally less hos- tile to Jewish refugees than other countries around the world, it did offer the chance of safety to ten thousand Jewish children through the Kindertransport program; it also offered refuge for Jewish women who were willing to work in other people’s houses or as hospital nurses. This article focuses on the lives of Jewish women refugees who entered the nursing profession. Despite severe nursing shortages as Britain faced the threat of war, the employment of Jewish women as nurses

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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