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Missionaries and the Early Development of Nursing in China

Missionaries and the Early Development of Nursing in China Missionaries and the Early Development of Nursing in China KAIYI CHBN University Archives University of Pennsylvania Nursing, along with modern Western medicine, was introduced to China by Warn medical missionaries. In the absence of trained nurses in tbe earliest days, medical missionary pioneers tried ro provide make.&& nurs- ing service with unskilled temporary Chinese assistants at their clinics and dispensaries. Elizabeth MdCechnie, a graduate nurse from the Woman's Hospiml of Philadelphia, was the first Westmn-trhed nurse to come to China. l On her arrival in Shanw in 1884, Miss McKechnie joined Dr. Elizabeth Reifsnydcr, a surgeon of the ~merian Women's Union Mission- ary Society and a graduate from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsyl- vania. They ran a small dispensary in Shanghai near a place ded Wat Gate.z According to the existing records, the Woman's Hospital of Phil- adelphia established the first chartered nm - school of North America in 1863. It was only some twenty years lam that the seed of modem nursing was transplanted from America to China.3 The last two decades of the nineteenth century saw a surge of mission- ary mthusiasm in both Noah America and England. By 1887, as many as seventy-four Western medical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Missionaries and the Early Development of Nursing in China

Nursing History Review , Volume 4 (1): 21 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.4.1.129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Missionaries and the Early Development of Nursing in China KAIYI CHBN University Archives University of Pennsylvania Nursing, along with modern Western medicine, was introduced to China by Warn medical missionaries. In the absence of trained nurses in tbe earliest days, medical missionary pioneers tried ro provide make.&& nurs- ing service with unskilled temporary Chinese assistants at their clinics and dispensaries. Elizabeth MdCechnie, a graduate nurse from the Woman's Hospiml of Philadelphia, was the first Westmn-trhed nurse to come to China. l On her arrival in Shanw in 1884, Miss McKechnie joined Dr. Elizabeth Reifsnydcr, a surgeon of the ~merian Women's Union Mission- ary Society and a graduate from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsyl- vania. They ran a small dispensary in Shanghai near a place ded Wat Gate.z According to the existing records, the Woman's Hospital of Phil- adelphia established the first chartered nm - school of North America in 1863. It was only some twenty years lam that the seed of modem nursing was transplanted from America to China.3 The last two decades of the nineteenth century saw a surge of mission- ary mthusiasm in both Noah America and England. By 1887, as many as seventy-four Western medical

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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