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Minority Group Elderly: Demographic Characteristics and Implications for Public Policy

Minority Group Elderly: Demographic Characteristics and Implications for Public Policy Minority Group Elderly: Demographic Characteristics and Implications for Public Policy The universal probIems and conditions of old age are exacerbated by racism, cultural differences, and linguistic differences. Regrettably, there is a paucity of useful data about the interaction between race and aging (Butler, 1975). Minority group elderly experience double if not multiple jeopardy because of the combined effects of racism and ageism as well as associated problems. While old age is often marked by poverty in the population at large, the likelihood of being poor is twice as great among minority aged as for majority aged (U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, 1970). As Butler has noted (1975) : Poverty is widespread among minority groups, and even the traditional kinship support of the family is broken down when the family as a whole is impoverished or the needs of the elderly outstrip the family's ability to help. In view of the combined effects of racism, ageism, and poverty, a detailed analysis and consideration of aging among minority groups is amply warranted. While the data on minority elderly have been growing, especially since the 196Qs, there remain serious deficiencies in our basic fund of information (Bell et al., 1976; Federal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Minority Group Elderly: Demographic Characteristics and Implications for Public Policy

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.1.1.261
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Minority Group Elderly: Demographic Characteristics and Implications for Public Policy The universal probIems and conditions of old age are exacerbated by racism, cultural differences, and linguistic differences. Regrettably, there is a paucity of useful data about the interaction between race and aging (Butler, 1975). Minority group elderly experience double if not multiple jeopardy because of the combined effects of racism and ageism as well as associated problems. While old age is often marked by poverty in the population at large, the likelihood of being poor is twice as great among minority aged as for majority aged (U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, 1970). As Butler has noted (1975) : Poverty is widespread among minority groups, and even the traditional kinship support of the family is broken down when the family as a whole is impoverished or the needs of the elderly outstrip the family's ability to help. In view of the combined effects of racism, ageism, and poverty, a detailed analysis and consideration of aging among minority groups is amply warranted. While the data on minority elderly have been growing, especially since the 196Qs, there remain serious deficiencies in our basic fund of information (Bell et al., 1976; Federal

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1980

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