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Mildred Tuttle: Private Initiative and Public Response in Nursing Education After World War II

Mildred Tuttle: Private Initiative and Public Response in Nursing Education After World War II Mildred Tuttle: Private Initiative and Public Response in Nursing Education After World War II JOAN E. LYNAUGH University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing I have long reflected on the complicated intersection between private sector ini- tiatives and public policy, especially as it relates to nursing and health care here in the United States. We really have no overarching philosophy of health care in this country. Only rarely do we achieve political consensus leading to large- scale planned change. But we do muddle along, trying to respond to problems that strain the social fabric and worry us. One traditional approach to solving social problems is through private initiatives or projects undertaken by people or organizations with a special interest or stake in a given problem. These days we call interested parties “stakeholders” in a slightly pejorative way. But if these private initiatives can attract public favor, political support, and funding, they sometimes lead to significant policy changes. This paper is about a private/public initiative in nursing in the decades after World War II. This particular initiative helped stimulate the reorganization and redefinition of nursing education at mid- century. The paper calls attention to nurses who engineered it and the problems http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Mildred Tuttle: Private Initiative and Public Response in Nursing Education After World War II

Nursing History Review , Volume 14 (1): 9 – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.14.203
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mildred Tuttle: Private Initiative and Public Response in Nursing Education After World War II JOAN E. LYNAUGH University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing I have long reflected on the complicated intersection between private sector ini- tiatives and public policy, especially as it relates to nursing and health care here in the United States. We really have no overarching philosophy of health care in this country. Only rarely do we achieve political consensus leading to large- scale planned change. But we do muddle along, trying to respond to problems that strain the social fabric and worry us. One traditional approach to solving social problems is through private initiatives or projects undertaken by people or organizations with a special interest or stake in a given problem. These days we call interested parties “stakeholders” in a slightly pejorative way. But if these private initiatives can attract public favor, political support, and funding, they sometimes lead to significant policy changes. This paper is about a private/public initiative in nursing in the decades after World War II. This particular initiative helped stimulate the reorganization and redefinition of nursing education at mid- century. The paper calls attention to nurses who engineered it and the problems

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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