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Mennonite Nurses in World War II: Maintaining the Thread of Pacifism in Nursing

Mennonite Nurses in World War II: Maintaining the Thread of Pacifism in Nursing Mennonite Nurses in World War II: Maintaining the Thread of Pacifism in Nursing ANN GRI\BER l-I ERSHBER(;J'R Eastern Mennonite Universiry Introducrion World War ll was an immensely popular war in the United Stares. ' Nursing hiscory books and articles are replete with stories of the conrributions of the profession during the war that came to be known as the Good War. The American journal o.fNtming(AJN) editions of 1940-1944, reflecting the patriotic feeli ngs of the war years, are filled with edicorials a nd articles that encourage individual participation on all froms of rhe war effort. In all, it is esrirnared thar 29 percent of the more than 240,000 acriv.: registered nurses were on dury with the armed services by the end of the w;~r, a nd rhar half of all registered nurses had vo lunteered bur were nor accepted. Mennonite nurses, however, were nor suppo rtive of the country's or rhe profession's involvement in rhe war. They responded differently ro rhe question of service to others. includ ing service co one's country. These Men non ire nurses were Christian pacifi~rs who , while desiring tO be contributing ci tizens of the United States, could nor in good conscience participate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Mennonite Nurses in World War II: Maintaining the Thread of Pacifism in Nursing

Nursing History Review , Volume 11 (1): 20 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.11.1.147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mennonite Nurses in World War II: Maintaining the Thread of Pacifism in Nursing ANN GRI\BER l-I ERSHBER(;J'R Eastern Mennonite Universiry Introducrion World War ll was an immensely popular war in the United Stares. ' Nursing hiscory books and articles are replete with stories of the conrributions of the profession during the war that came to be known as the Good War. The American journal o.fNtming(AJN) editions of 1940-1944, reflecting the patriotic feeli ngs of the war years, are filled with edicorials a nd articles that encourage individual participation on all froms of rhe war effort. In all, it is esrirnared thar 29 percent of the more than 240,000 acriv.: registered nurses were on dury with the armed services by the end of the w;~r, a nd rhar half of all registered nurses had vo lunteered bur were nor accepted. Mennonite nurses, however, were nor suppo rtive of the country's or rhe profession's involvement in rhe war. They responded differently ro rhe question of service to others. includ ing service co one's country. These Men non ire nurses were Christian pacifi~rs who , while desiring tO be contributing ci tizens of the United States, could nor in good conscience participate

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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