Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School, By Jim Kristofic

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School, By Jim Kristofic Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School BOOK REVIEWS By Jim Kristofic (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2019) (396 pages; $34.95 paperback) In Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School, histo- rian Jim Kristofic provides a dramatic and detailed saga of the inception, growth, and eventual decline of the Ganado Mission on the Navajo Indian reservation in northern Arizona during the years 1902 to 1969. Clearly a skilled writer, Kristofic captures the reader’s attention in the first paragraph of the Prologue—introduc- ing the possibility that Dr. Clarence Salsbury, the lead physician at Ganado, might not be “alive the next morning” (p. 1). The Navajo community was angry; one of Salsbury’s patients had just died in the Mission Hospital. Leaving the reader in suspense about what will happen to Salsbury, the author then docu- ments the founding of the Presbyterian mission and the struggles of its personnel during the first half of the twentieth century. This ninety-five-page interruption to the narrative is sometimes tedious, but clearly accurate and well sourced. Setting the stage for the inception of the nursing school is of course impor- tant, and the author uses detailed description to document http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School, By Jim Kristofic

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 2 – Dec 24, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/medicine-women-the-story-of-the-first-native-american-nursing-school-0cEYKMK3AC
Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School BOOK REVIEWS By Jim Kristofic (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2019) (396 pages; $34.95 paperback) In Medicine Women: The Story of the First Native American Nursing School, histo- rian Jim Kristofic provides a dramatic and detailed saga of the inception, growth, and eventual decline of the Ganado Mission on the Navajo Indian reservation in northern Arizona during the years 1902 to 1969. Clearly a skilled writer, Kristofic captures the reader’s attention in the first paragraph of the Prologue—introduc- ing the possibility that Dr. Clarence Salsbury, the lead physician at Ganado, might not be “alive the next morning” (p. 1). The Navajo community was angry; one of Salsbury’s patients had just died in the Mission Hospital. Leaving the reader in suspense about what will happen to Salsbury, the author then docu- ments the founding of the Presbyterian mission and the struggles of its personnel during the first half of the twentieth century. This ninety-five-page interruption to the narrative is sometimes tedious, but clearly accurate and well sourced. Setting the stage for the inception of the nursing school is of course impor- tant, and the author uses detailed description to document

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

There are no references for this article.