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Maria Stromberger: A Nurse in the Resistance in Auschwitz

Maria Stromberger: A Nurse in the Resistance in Auschwitz Maria Stromberger: A Nurse in the Resistance in Auschwitz SUSAN BENEDICT Medical University of South Carolina During World War II, Maria Stromberger (Figure 1) was employed, by her own choice, as the Oberschwester (head nurse) in the SS (Schutzstaffel, Nazi Security Staff ) infirmary of Auschwitz, one of Nazi Germany’s most infamous concen- tration camps. While there, she risked her life numerous times to save Polish inmates from torture and death. For this, she was made an honorary member of the Austrian Union of Former Prisoners of Concentration Camps, but she has otherwise received little recognition for her bravery. Auschwitz has come to symbolize the extermination camps of Nazi Ger- many. It was both the largest concentration camp and the largest killing center. It is located on the outskirts of O¡wie˛cim, Poland, 50 kilometers (km) southwest of Krakow and 286 km from Warsaw. The idea to build a camp in Poland began in 1940 by the SS and the district police because there was no facility adequate to hold the large number of Polish resistance prisoners. The first buildings of what was to become the Auschwitz concentration camp were fourteen one-story army barracks and eight two-story buildings built during http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Maria Stromberger: A Nurse in the Resistance in Auschwitz

Nursing History Review , Volume 14 (1): 14 – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.14.189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maria Stromberger: A Nurse in the Resistance in Auschwitz SUSAN BENEDICT Medical University of South Carolina During World War II, Maria Stromberger (Figure 1) was employed, by her own choice, as the Oberschwester (head nurse) in the SS (Schutzstaffel, Nazi Security Staff ) infirmary of Auschwitz, one of Nazi Germany’s most infamous concen- tration camps. While there, she risked her life numerous times to save Polish inmates from torture and death. For this, she was made an honorary member of the Austrian Union of Former Prisoners of Concentration Camps, but she has otherwise received little recognition for her bravery. Auschwitz has come to symbolize the extermination camps of Nazi Ger- many. It was both the largest concentration camp and the largest killing center. It is located on the outskirts of O¡wie˛cim, Poland, 50 kilometers (km) southwest of Krakow and 286 km from Warsaw. The idea to build a camp in Poland began in 1940 by the SS and the district police because there was no facility adequate to hold the large number of Polish resistance prisoners. The first buildings of what was to become the Auschwitz concentration camp were fourteen one-story army barracks and eight two-story buildings built during

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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