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Making Do with the Midwife: Arkansas’s Mamie O. Hale in the 1940s

Making Do with the Midwife: Arkansas’s Mamie O. Hale in the 1940s "Making Do" with the Midwife Arkansas's Mamie 0. Hale in. the 190s PBQGB L. BELL College of Nming University of Arkamas for Mtdical Sciences The United States Children's Bureau in the late 1930s targeted the develop- ment of child-weIfare services for rural blacks.' Of southem states with high mtal black populations, Arkansas ranked ninth. Developing servim for the black population induded atabbshing casework programs and using special d~nsmtion units administered by ld health depart- menn s& by bhck personnel. This article wiU explore the efforts of one such program developed in Arkansas during the r~os to try to address the disparity betwen black and white maternal and infant mortality rates. Its particular focus is on the work of Mamie 0. Hale, a black nurse-midwfie, and her conuibuaons to a statewide training program for granny mid- wives. The Plight of Arkansas's Blacks in the 1940s In IW over two thirds of Arkansas's Mack and white population livcd in rural arcas; the state ranked as the thd most ma1 state in tRe c~unsy.~ As with other rural states, Arkansas suffered from a shortage of physicians, nursa, and hospimls. This shortage of health care providers meant that residents of many rural counties http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Making Do with the Midwife: Arkansas’s Mamie O. Hale in the 1940s

Nursing History Review , Volume 1 (1): 15 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.1.1.155
Publisher site
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Abstract

"Making Do" with the Midwife Arkansas's Mamie 0. Hale in. the 190s PBQGB L. BELL College of Nming University of Arkamas for Mtdical Sciences The United States Children's Bureau in the late 1930s targeted the develop- ment of child-weIfare services for rural blacks.' Of southem states with high mtal black populations, Arkansas ranked ninth. Developing servim for the black population induded atabbshing casework programs and using special d~nsmtion units administered by ld health depart- menn s& by bhck personnel. This article wiU explore the efforts of one such program developed in Arkansas during the r~os to try to address the disparity betwen black and white maternal and infant mortality rates. Its particular focus is on the work of Mamie 0. Hale, a black nurse-midwfie, and her conuibuaons to a statewide training program for granny mid- wives. The Plight of Arkansas's Blacks in the 1940s In IW over two thirds of Arkansas's Mack and white population livcd in rural arcas; the state ranked as the thd most ma1 state in tRe c~unsy.~ As with other rural states, Arkansas suffered from a shortage of physicians, nursa, and hospimls. This shortage of health care providers meant that residents of many rural counties

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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