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Learning, Faith and Caring: History of the Georgetown University School of Nursing, 1903–2000

Learning, Faith and Caring: History of the Georgetown University School of Nursing, 1903–2000 194 Book Reviews Catholic institutions experienced w irh the exit of many nursing sisters. Some of the last case studies depict patients with renal transplants and illustrate the tech no logical complexities that are so typical of modern hospitals. The final c hapter is perhaps rhe most interesting. It concentrates on a special AI OS unir at San Francisco General Hospir.al in rhe 1980s. Risse describes rhe construction of AIDS as a disease, patients' emotions and clinical trajectories, and the increasing reliance on collaboration in patienr-sraff relationships. Nursing plays an important role in this history. T h e religious and lay brothers and sisters in the early monasteries, the 1-lospitallers in Jerusalem, the Sisters of Charity in France, the Nightingale nurses ar the Royal I nfirmary of Edinburgh, the intensive care nurses at Mercy Hospital, and those at San Francisco General are consistently portrayed as skilled, compassionate caregivers. Indeed, Risse amibutes the low mortality of patients with typhoid fever at Johns Hopkins to "empathetic nursing" rarher than to medical care (p. 421). And with the increasing impotence of regu lar medici ne in rhe treatment of AIDS, nurses were p laced "at the center of patient care" (p. 646). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Learning, Faith and Caring: History of the Georgetown University School of Nursing, 1903–2000

Nursing History Review , Volume 10 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.10.1.194
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

194 Book Reviews Catholic institutions experienced w irh the exit of many nursing sisters. Some of the last case studies depict patients with renal transplants and illustrate the tech no logical complexities that are so typical of modern hospitals. The final c hapter is perhaps rhe most interesting. It concentrates on a special AI OS unir at San Francisco General Hospir.al in rhe 1980s. Risse describes rhe construction of AIDS as a disease, patients' emotions and clinical trajectories, and the increasing reliance on collaboration in patienr-sraff relationships. Nursing plays an important role in this history. T h e religious and lay brothers and sisters in the early monasteries, the 1-lospitallers in Jerusalem, the Sisters of Charity in France, the Nightingale nurses ar the Royal I nfirmary of Edinburgh, the intensive care nurses at Mercy Hospital, and those at San Francisco General are consistently portrayed as skilled, compassionate caregivers. Indeed, Risse amibutes the low mortality of patients with typhoid fever at Johns Hopkins to "empathetic nursing" rarher than to medical care (p. 421). And with the increasing impotence of regu lar medici ne in rhe treatment of AIDS, nurses were p laced "at the center of patient care" (p. 646).

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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