Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Jane A. Delano: Saint or Sellout?

Jane A. Delano: Saint or Sellout? RUTH E. MALONB School of Nursing University of California, San Francisco History tends to make us hwnble. It many times shows us that the work which we think original is only a repetition of that which has been done before. It shows us how our predecessors struggled with problems almost exactly like those we meet. Goodnow (1937) Jane A. Delano was called "the Florence Nightingale of America" for her work during a yellow fever outbreak. "One of the conunanding figures in American nursing," she volunteered her full-time services to the American Red Cross for the last ten years of her life; she also fought successfully to increase pay and status for military nurses. During the turbulent years of World War I, she was undoubtedly the most widely beloved nurse in the United States. After her death, thousands attended memorial services held in her honor throughout the country; New York's Carnegie Hall was filled to capacity for one such service. Buried with full honors at Arlington National Cemetery, she was revered, decades after her death, as a martyred heroine. Yet, at the zenith of her distinguished career, she took the side of a hospital administrator-physician against the nation's most influential http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Jane A. Delano: Saint or Sellout?

Nursing History Review , Volume 2 (1): 31 – Jan 1, 1994

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/jane-a-delano-saint-or-sellout-1494NYYqSB
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.67
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RUTH E. MALONB School of Nursing University of California, San Francisco History tends to make us hwnble. It many times shows us that the work which we think original is only a repetition of that which has been done before. It shows us how our predecessors struggled with problems almost exactly like those we meet. Goodnow (1937) Jane A. Delano was called "the Florence Nightingale of America" for her work during a yellow fever outbreak. "One of the conunanding figures in American nursing," she volunteered her full-time services to the American Red Cross for the last ten years of her life; she also fought successfully to increase pay and status for military nurses. During the turbulent years of World War I, she was undoubtedly the most widely beloved nurse in the United States. After her death, thousands attended memorial services held in her honor throughout the country; New York's Carnegie Hall was filled to capacity for one such service. Buried with full honors at Arlington National Cemetery, she was revered, decades after her death, as a martyred heroine. Yet, at the zenith of her distinguished career, she took the side of a hospital administrator-physician against the nation's most influential

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.