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Irish Medical Education and Student Culture, c.1850–1950, by Laura Kelly

Irish Medical Education and Student Culture, c.1850–1950, by Laura Kelly IrishMedicalEducationandStudentCulture,c.1850 1950 ByLauraKelly (Liverpool,UK:LiverpoolUniversityPress,2011)(276pages;$120.00; hardcover) In contrast to the noticeably whiggish character of earlier monograph histo- ries of modern scientific medicine in Ireland, Irish medical historiography in thetwenty-firstcenturyoffersamorecriticalscholarship,dueinmuchpart,to its location within medical humanities departments and academic centers in Ireland,theUKandelsewhere.LauraKelly Irish’s MedicalEducationandStu- dent Culture, c.18501950 represents a valuable addition to contemporary analytical and contextual medical historiography and addresses a topic that, somewhat surprisingly, has not been treated to the same extent as, for exam- ple, the history of nursing education. The book comprehensively describes andanalysesthedevelopmentofmedicaleducation,withaparticularfocuson the profiles, curricular experiences, training culture and the social life of the medical student. Presented in seven chapters, the book covers a century of developments, beginning in 1850, when Irish medicine had established an international reputation for its treatment methods and scientific discoveries and apprenticeship training was replaced by a standardized curriculum, and endingin1950,whenwomenhadestablishedtheirplaceinmedicalschools. Kellyexamines howthe medical pupils’image and roleexpectations over thelatterhalfofthenineteenthcenturyweretransformedfromoneofpoten- tiallycorruptibleyoungmentoheroesengagedina“manlyandnobleprofes- sion.” The association of medicine with “manliness and masculinity” became partoftheprevailingdiscourseandmayaccountforthecommonusageofthe moniker“medicalman”innormativetextsandinwiderprofessionaldiscourse. Kelly discusses the class background of medical students and writes that “social mobility and a sense of middle-class respectability” were part of the motivation for pursuing medical education. She identifies the various feeder secondary schools that provided applicants to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Irish Medical Education and Student Culture, c.1850–1950, by Laura Kelly

Nursing History Review , Volume 28 (1): 3 – Sep 19, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.28.212
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Abstract

IrishMedicalEducationandStudentCulture,c.1850 1950 ByLauraKelly (Liverpool,UK:LiverpoolUniversityPress,2011)(276pages;$120.00; hardcover) In contrast to the noticeably whiggish character of earlier monograph histo- ries of modern scientific medicine in Ireland, Irish medical historiography in thetwenty-firstcenturyoffersamorecriticalscholarship,dueinmuchpart,to its location within medical humanities departments and academic centers in Ireland,theUKandelsewhere.LauraKelly Irish’s MedicalEducationandStu- dent Culture, c.18501950 represents a valuable addition to contemporary analytical and contextual medical historiography and addresses a topic that, somewhat surprisingly, has not been treated to the same extent as, for exam- ple, the history of nursing education. The book comprehensively describes andanalysesthedevelopmentofmedicaleducation,withaparticularfocuson the profiles, curricular experiences, training culture and the social life of the medical student. Presented in seven chapters, the book covers a century of developments, beginning in 1850, when Irish medicine had established an international reputation for its treatment methods and scientific discoveries and apprenticeship training was replaced by a standardized curriculum, and endingin1950,whenwomenhadestablishedtheirplaceinmedicalschools. Kellyexamines howthe medical pupils’image and roleexpectations over thelatterhalfofthenineteenthcenturyweretransformedfromoneofpoten- tiallycorruptibleyoungmentoheroesengagedina“manlyandnobleprofes- sion.” The association of medicine with “manliness and masculinity” became partoftheprevailingdiscourseandmayaccountforthecommonusageofthe moniker“medicalman”innormativetextsandinwiderprofessionaldiscourse. Kelly discusses the class background of medical students and writes that “social mobility and a sense of middle-class respectability” were part of the motivation for pursuing medical education. She identifies the various feeder secondary schools that provided applicants to the

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 19, 2019

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