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Intergenerational Transfers: Economic, Demographic, and Social Perspectives

Intergenerational Transfers: Economic, Demographic, and Social Perspectives CHAYfER 9 Intergenerational Transfers: Economic, Demographic, and Social Perspectives BElli J. SOLDO DEPARTME.'IT OF DEMOGRAPHY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARTH A s. HILL I NST ITUTE FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH UN IVliRSITY 0 1' MICIITGAN In rccenl years Ihe fam.ily and its functions hav e attracted the attention of research ers and policy mak ers alike. Of particular int erest, given the grow in g costs o f depende ncy and hea lth care, ha s bee n th e idea that famil y networks provide a viable alternative to direct gove rnm ent support. At the sa me time, the famil y has bee n cha ngi ng. Because of dec lines in mort alit y, as well as chan ges in marriage and fertilit y pattern s, there has been an increase ill both the re lative and absolute number of years adult children and the ir older pa rents cos urvivc (Watkin s, Bongaarts, & Menken , 1987). Preston (1984) eSlimales that for the fi rst time in hi slo ry, th e average married couple has more survivin g parcnts than chi ld ren. Despi te thi s, th e proportion of eld erly parents coresiding with adu http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Intergenerational Transfers: Economic, Demographic, and Social Perspectives

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.13.1.187
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAYfER 9 Intergenerational Transfers: Economic, Demographic, and Social Perspectives BElli J. SOLDO DEPARTME.'IT OF DEMOGRAPHY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARTH A s. HILL I NST ITUTE FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH UN IVliRSITY 0 1' MICIITGAN In rccenl years Ihe fam.ily and its functions hav e attracted the attention of research ers and policy mak ers alike. Of particular int erest, given the grow in g costs o f depende ncy and hea lth care, ha s bee n th e idea that famil y networks provide a viable alternative to direct gove rnm ent support. At the sa me time, the famil y has bee n cha ngi ng. Because of dec lines in mort alit y, as well as chan ges in marriage and fertilit y pattern s, there has been an increase ill both the re lative and absolute number of years adult children and the ir older pa rents cos urvivc (Watkin s, Bongaarts, & Menken , 1987). Preston (1984) eSlimales that for the fi rst time in hi slo ry, th e average married couple has more survivin g parcnts than chi ld ren. Despi te thi s, th e proportion of eld erly parents coresiding with adu

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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