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Industry and Autonomy in Early Occupational Health Nursing: The Welfare Officers of the Lancashire Cotton Mills in the Mid-Twentieth Century

Industry and Autonomy in Early Occupational Health Nursing: The Welfare Officers of the... Industry and Autonomy in Early Occupational Health Nursing: The Welfare Officers of the Lancashire Cotton Mills in the Mid-Twentieth Century CHRISTINE HALLETT, MICHELE ABENDSTERN, AND LESLEY WADE University of Manchester In her incisive study What Makes Women Sick, Lesley Doyal observed that women throughout the world have long been employed in hazardous industries, often for lower pay than their male counterparts, and often in nonunionized workforces. A number of authors have observed that women have been driven into low-paid employment, often involving very poor working conditions, sometimes because of the desire for a measure of economic independence but more frequently be- cause of economic hardship. Such hardship has frequently been linked to moth- erhood; women have often undertaken strenuous and difficult work along with the work of raising a family. Moreover, the pressure of piecework and an abun- dance of available labor meant that many of them would go to work even when ill or injured. Welfare officers were introduced into the Lancashire cotton mills during the middle years of the twentieth century as a response to regulatory requirements that followed in the wake of the 1916 Factory Act. A number of welfare officers employed by mill owners in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Industry and Autonomy in Early Occupational Health Nursing: The Welfare Officers of the Lancashire Cotton Mills in the Mid-Twentieth Century

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.14.89
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Industry and Autonomy in Early Occupational Health Nursing: The Welfare Officers of the Lancashire Cotton Mills in the Mid-Twentieth Century CHRISTINE HALLETT, MICHELE ABENDSTERN, AND LESLEY WADE University of Manchester In her incisive study What Makes Women Sick, Lesley Doyal observed that women throughout the world have long been employed in hazardous industries, often for lower pay than their male counterparts, and often in nonunionized workforces. A number of authors have observed that women have been driven into low-paid employment, often involving very poor working conditions, sometimes because of the desire for a measure of economic independence but more frequently be- cause of economic hardship. Such hardship has frequently been linked to moth- erhood; women have often undertaken strenuous and difficult work along with the work of raising a family. Moreover, the pressure of piecework and an abun- dance of available labor meant that many of them would go to work even when ill or injured. Welfare officers were introduced into the Lancashire cotton mills during the middle years of the twentieth century as a response to regulatory requirements that followed in the wake of the 1916 Factory Act. A number of welfare officers employed by mill owners in

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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