Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

In Memory Of ...: Virginia Avenel Henderson 1897-1996

In Memory Of ...: Virginia Avenel Henderson 1897-1996 IN MEMORY OF . . . Virginia Avenel Henderson 1897-1996 Reflections on a Life More than sixty years ago, Virginia Henderson's may on medical and surgiwl asepsis ms published in the Nursing Ehc~tbn Bulktin by Teachers College, Columbia Universi ty.' Linking principles from biomedicd sciences, the every- day technology used by nurses, and her own beliefs about nurses' responsibili- tics to their patients, Miss Henderson insisted that nurses know and apply the research upon which heir work mwr be based.' Of course her textbooks, articles, the invaluable Nuwing Stdia In&, and her definition of nursing, which she promulgated in the 1950s, are well known. For those of us in academic nursing, howevu, Miss Henderson's work in the 1930s is especially fascinating. She was unwavering in her bclicf that nurses must be highly educated and individually responsible for their actions. She also held that nursing required broad understandings from the hummitits and arts; she argued for curiosiry and cven well honed intuition as essential in the full practice of nursing. Today we assume nurses will learn basic sciences, social scicnets, humani- ties and clinical sciences taught by faculty qualified in their subjects. We expect nurses to recognize and act on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

In Memory Of ...: Virginia Avenel Henderson 1897-1996

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/in-memory-of-virginia-avenel-henderson-1897-1996-eW0kNFE1lV
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.177
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IN MEMORY OF . . . Virginia Avenel Henderson 1897-1996 Reflections on a Life More than sixty years ago, Virginia Henderson's may on medical and surgiwl asepsis ms published in the Nursing Ehc~tbn Bulktin by Teachers College, Columbia Universi ty.' Linking principles from biomedicd sciences, the every- day technology used by nurses, and her own beliefs about nurses' responsibili- tics to their patients, Miss Henderson insisted that nurses know and apply the research upon which heir work mwr be based.' Of course her textbooks, articles, the invaluable Nuwing Stdia In&, and her definition of nursing, which she promulgated in the 1950s, are well known. For those of us in academic nursing, howevu, Miss Henderson's work in the 1930s is especially fascinating. She was unwavering in her bclicf that nurses must be highly educated and individually responsible for their actions. She also held that nursing required broad understandings from the hummitits and arts; she argued for curiosiry and cven well honed intuition as essential in the full practice of nursing. Today we assume nurses will learn basic sciences, social scicnets, humani- ties and clinical sciences taught by faculty qualified in their subjects. We expect nurses to recognize and act on

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.