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Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and Humanitarianism in the Letters of British, Australian, and New Zealand Professional Nurses, 1914–1918

Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and Humanitarianism in the Letters of British, Australian, and New... ARTICLES Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and Humanitarianism in the Letters of British, Australian, and New Zealand Professional Nurses, 1914–1918 Christine E. Hallett University of Huddersfield Pamela Wood Independent Historian, Taupō, New Zealand Introduction During the First World War, thousands of professional nurses from Britain, Australia, and New Zealand volunteered to serve in their nations’ military nurs- ing services. The British services, consisting of the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS) and the Territorial Force Nursing Ser- vice (TFNS), were mobilized rapidly in the late summer and autumn of 1914. Volunteer assistants (known as VADs because of their position within Volun- tary Aid Detachments) worked alongside the professional nurses in military hospitals, and served in general hospitals at military bases overseas beginning in the spring of 1915. The Australian Army Nursing Service (AANS), a more coherent single unit than the British services, mobilized in the later summer and autumn of 1914. Another discrete unit, the New Zealand Army Nursing Service (NZANS), formed slowly during the first nine months of the war . Nursing History Review 30 (2022): 62–94. A Publication of the American Association for the History of Nursing. Copyright © 2022 Springer Publishing Company. http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1062-8061.30.62 Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and Humanitarianism in the Letters of British, Australian, and New Zealand Professional Nurses, 1914–1918

Nursing History Review , Volume 30 (1): 33 – Jan 28, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.30.62
Publisher site
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Abstract

ARTICLES Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and Humanitarianism in the Letters of British, Australian, and New Zealand Professional Nurses, 1914–1918 Christine E. Hallett University of Huddersfield Pamela Wood Independent Historian, Taupō, New Zealand Introduction During the First World War, thousands of professional nurses from Britain, Australia, and New Zealand volunteered to serve in their nations’ military nurs- ing services. The British services, consisting of the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS) and the Territorial Force Nursing Ser- vice (TFNS), were mobilized rapidly in the late summer and autumn of 1914. Volunteer assistants (known as VADs because of their position within Volun- tary Aid Detachments) worked alongside the professional nurses in military hospitals, and served in general hospitals at military bases overseas beginning in the spring of 1915. The Australian Army Nursing Service (AANS), a more coherent single unit than the British services, mobilized in the later summer and autumn of 1914. Another discrete unit, the New Zealand Army Nursing Service (NZANS), formed slowly during the first nine months of the war . Nursing History Review 30 (2022): 62–94. A Publication of the American Association for the History of Nursing. Copyright © 2022 Springer Publishing Company. http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1062-8061.30.62 Imperial Sisters: Patriotism and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2022

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