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Images of Nurses: Perspectives from History, Art, and Literature

Images of Nurses: Perspectives from History, Art, and Literature 234 Book Reviews assumption. In my reading of accoWlts by women who nursed in the Confederacy, I foWld not altruistic stories, but detailed, depressing docu­ mentation of the stresses, strains, hardships, and conflicts that these women experienced (Keeling, 1989). Rabie therefore should be applauded for his accuracy, perceptive interpretation, and realism in his accoWlts of nursing in the South. In conclusion, by portraying a panoramic view of women in the South, Rabie cannot focus on a particular social class of women, as Clinton does in Plantation Mistress (1982), nor can he provide an in-depth account of one specific group of women that cut across class lines, such as those women who nursed the sick during the war. However, Rabie's ability to present with some cohesiveness and analysis the findings of his exhaustive research far outweighs these weaknesses. The author has made a major contribution to the field of southern women's history. His book should be read by historians and nursing scholars interested in southern women, nursing, and the Civil War. ARLENE W. KEELING, PhD, RN Assistant Professor Associate Director, The Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry School of Nursing University of Virginia Charlottesville, Va. References Clinton, C. The Plantation Mistress: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Images of Nurses: Perspectives from History, Art, and Literature

Nursing History Review , Volume 2 (1): 4 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.234
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

234 Book Reviews assumption. In my reading of accoWlts by women who nursed in the Confederacy, I foWld not altruistic stories, but detailed, depressing docu­ mentation of the stresses, strains, hardships, and conflicts that these women experienced (Keeling, 1989). Rabie therefore should be applauded for his accuracy, perceptive interpretation, and realism in his accoWlts of nursing in the South. In conclusion, by portraying a panoramic view of women in the South, Rabie cannot focus on a particular social class of women, as Clinton does in Plantation Mistress (1982), nor can he provide an in-depth account of one specific group of women that cut across class lines, such as those women who nursed the sick during the war. However, Rabie's ability to present with some cohesiveness and analysis the findings of his exhaustive research far outweighs these weaknesses. The author has made a major contribution to the field of southern women's history. His book should be read by historians and nursing scholars interested in southern women, nursing, and the Civil War. ARLENE W. KEELING, PhD, RN Assistant Professor Associate Director, The Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry School of Nursing University of Virginia Charlottesville, Va. References Clinton, C. The Plantation Mistress:

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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