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Home Nursing, Gender, and Confederate Nationalism in the American Civil War (1861–1865)

Home Nursing, Gender, and Confederate Nationalism in the American Civil War (1861–1865) Home Nursing, Gender, and Confederate Nationalism in the American Civil War (1861–1865) Kristen Brill Keele University In June 1863, writing in the midst of the siege of Vicksburg and one month before the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War (1861–1865), the famed diarist Mary Chesnut reflected on women’s nursing service to the Con- federate war effort at this crucial military turning point of the war: I learn that Richmond women go in their carriages for the wounded, carry them home and nurse them. One saw a man too weak to hold his musket. She took it from him, put it on her shoulder, and helped the poor fellow along. Over the course of the war, Confederate women routinely opened their own homes to provide necessary care for wounded Confederate soldiers unable to receive care in the hospitals of the Confederate Medical Department. Such cross-gender, often cross-class encounters between Confederate women and Confederate soldiers were central to both the military and civilian experiences of war on the home front. Soldiers depended on women for care outside of the Confederate Medical Department and this, in turn, created new wartime roles for women and strengthened Confederate nationalism on the home http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Home Nursing, Gender, and Confederate Nationalism in the American Civil War (1861–1865)

Nursing History Review , Volume 30 (1): 24 – Jan 28, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.30.95
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Home Nursing, Gender, and Confederate Nationalism in the American Civil War (1861–1865) Kristen Brill Keele University In June 1863, writing in the midst of the siege of Vicksburg and one month before the Battle of Gettysburg in the American Civil War (1861–1865), the famed diarist Mary Chesnut reflected on women’s nursing service to the Con- federate war effort at this crucial military turning point of the war: I learn that Richmond women go in their carriages for the wounded, carry them home and nurse them. One saw a man too weak to hold his musket. She took it from him, put it on her shoulder, and helped the poor fellow along. Over the course of the war, Confederate women routinely opened their own homes to provide necessary care for wounded Confederate soldiers unable to receive care in the hospitals of the Confederate Medical Department. Such cross-gender, often cross-class encounters between Confederate women and Confederate soldiers were central to both the military and civilian experiences of war on the home front. Soldiers depended on women for care outside of the Confederate Medical Department and this, in turn, created new wartime roles for women and strengthened Confederate nationalism on the home

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2022

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