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History and Nursing Knowledge

History and Nursing Knowledge GUEST EDITOR’S NOTE A worn, purple-covered nursing textbook rests in a recess of my library shelves, a marker to a professional homecoming; to recognition of the free- dom, sentience, and creativity of the nursing imagination; and to the idea of distinctively nursing knowledge that can illuminate and guide practice. The purple book, An Introduction to the Theoretical Bases of Nursing , focuses on a particular approach to nursing knowledge. But arguably, the most enduring legacy of its author, Martha Rogers, was a love of ideas, oft in- scribed with affection to her students: “Best wishes for an exciting future in ideas.” Martha loved the idea of nursing history. In the prologue of her purple book, she sketches nursing’s history in ideas and symbols from earliest times. Perhaps drawing on the etymological root of the word history, “to know” or “to see,” she believed that in developing nursing knowledge, nurses must never lose sight of the historical commitment of nursing to human service or to the age-old principle that “nurture of the human race has been its ever-present and central concern.” This historical commitment is compellingly illuminated in nurse sym- bols evident in archaeological literature reaching back around 7,000 years; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

History and Nursing Knowledge

Nursing History Review , Volume 21 (1): 4 – Jan 1, 2013

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.21.10
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

GUEST EDITOR’S NOTE A worn, purple-covered nursing textbook rests in a recess of my library shelves, a marker to a professional homecoming; to recognition of the free- dom, sentience, and creativity of the nursing imagination; and to the idea of distinctively nursing knowledge that can illuminate and guide practice. The purple book, An Introduction to the Theoretical Bases of Nursing , focuses on a particular approach to nursing knowledge. But arguably, the most enduring legacy of its author, Martha Rogers, was a love of ideas, oft in- scribed with affection to her students: “Best wishes for an exciting future in ideas.” Martha loved the idea of nursing history. In the prologue of her purple book, she sketches nursing’s history in ideas and symbols from earliest times. Perhaps drawing on the etymological root of the word history, “to know” or “to see,” she believed that in developing nursing knowledge, nurses must never lose sight of the historical commitment of nursing to human service or to the age-old principle that “nurture of the human race has been its ever-present and central concern.” This historical commitment is compellingly illuminated in nurse sym- bols evident in archaeological literature reaching back around 7,000 years;

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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