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Hidden and Forgotten: Being Black in the American Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service, 1912–1948

Hidden and Forgotten: Being Black in the American Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service,... INAUGURAL LORRAINE ALBRECHT LECTURE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ELEANOR CROWDER BJORING CENTER FOR HISTORICAL NURSING INQUIRY Hidden and Forgotten: Being Black in the American Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service, 1912–1948 Sandra B. Lewenson Pace University Early 20th-century morbidity and mortality rates show that African Americans in rural communities fared far worse than their white counterpar While ts. all populations living in rural settings shared a lack of access to health care due to difficult travel over poor roads, an insufficient number of health care providers willing to deal with working in isolated settings, and too often the effects of poverty, health care disparities were further compounded by race. To improve rural health care in the United States—especially for white rural populations—the American Red Cross (ARC) between 1912 and 1948 experimented with the notion of using its vast quasi national organization to support local communities to develop public health nursing structures. The ARC established the Town and Country Nursing Service to accomplish this goal. This unique experiment in peacetime health care advocacy, from its in - ception, found it difficult to attract white-educated nurses with the required rural public health training to leave the cities for rural communities. It http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Hidden and Forgotten: Being Black in the American Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service, 1912–1948

Nursing History Review , Volume 27 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.27.15
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INAUGURAL LORRAINE ALBRECHT LECTURE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA ELEANOR CROWDER BJORING CENTER FOR HISTORICAL NURSING INQUIRY Hidden and Forgotten: Being Black in the American Red Cross Town and Country Nursing Service, 1912–1948 Sandra B. Lewenson Pace University Early 20th-century morbidity and mortality rates show that African Americans in rural communities fared far worse than their white counterpar While ts. all populations living in rural settings shared a lack of access to health care due to difficult travel over poor roads, an insufficient number of health care providers willing to deal with working in isolated settings, and too often the effects of poverty, health care disparities were further compounded by race. To improve rural health care in the United States—especially for white rural populations—the American Red Cross (ARC) between 1912 and 1948 experimented with the notion of using its vast quasi national organization to support local communities to develop public health nursing structures. The ARC established the Town and Country Nursing Service to accomplish this goal. This unique experiment in peacetime health care advocacy, from its in - ception, found it difficult to attract white-educated nurses with the required rural public health training to leave the cities for rural communities. It

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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