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Health Care’s Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars

Health Care’s Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars Health Care's Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars By J. Goodman-Draper (Westport, a Auburn House, 1995) ne study of the laboring classes constitutes an expansive area of inquiry for historians and sociologists. Nurses are often the focus of such inquiry, un- doubtedly because they epitomize broader socid and labor issues related to the status ofwornen. Goodman-Draper has offered yet another excellent contribu- tion to che numerous high quality reports in the literature on this topic. The text is particuIatly noteworthy for its remarkable brevity and wpt: simplicity of presentation. This approach is commendable in vim of the complexity of the topics of labor and dass identity. The author presents her arguments primarily from the standpoint of swiologid theories on labor and class, using less of a focus on gender than is found in similar works. This allows her the opportunity to explore other factors that influence the work status of nurses and broaden the historical perspective on this topic. Also unique is the author's use of both historical and contemporary data sources, induding interviews with nurses employed at two appropriately diverse hospitals in New York City. Goodman-Draper states the central question fbr the study as: 'Does nurses' http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Health Care’s Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Health Care's Forgotten Majority: Nurses and Their Frayed White Collars By J. Goodman-Draper (Westport, a Auburn House, 1995) ne study of the laboring classes constitutes an expansive area of inquiry for historians and sociologists. Nurses are often the focus of such inquiry, un- doubtedly because they epitomize broader socid and labor issues related to the status ofwornen. Goodman-Draper has offered yet another excellent contribu- tion to che numerous high quality reports in the literature on this topic. The text is particuIatly noteworthy for its remarkable brevity and wpt: simplicity of presentation. This approach is commendable in vim of the complexity of the topics of labor and dass identity. The author presents her arguments primarily from the standpoint of swiologid theories on labor and class, using less of a focus on gender than is found in similar works. This allows her the opportunity to explore other factors that influence the work status of nurses and broaden the historical perspective on this topic. Also unique is the author's use of both historical and contemporary data sources, induding interviews with nurses employed at two appropriately diverse hospitals in New York City. Goodman-Draper states the central question fbr the study as: 'Does nurses'

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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