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Guest Editor’s Note

Guest Editor’s Note ACCOUNTING FOR THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME-PLACE, WORKPLACE, LANDSCAPE, AND IDENTITY IN CANADIAN HEALTH CARE SERVICES Here/there. Us/them. City/countryside. Colonizer/colonized. Social relations of space and place—the ways geographic distance and social power are mu- tually constitutive —have animated a rich body of scholarship in Canadian nursing history. The two articles presented in this section add to that scholar- ship in important new ways. Prepared for a panel discussion called “Account- ing For the Importance of Home-place, Workplace, Landscape and Identity in Canadian Health Care Services,” presented at the 2011 Joint Conference of the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing and the Canadian Soci- ety for the History of Medicine, the papers generate a fascinating reevaluation of nurses’ work in rural and northern communities, past and present. Canada was, by 1921, a nation more urban than rural ; and in those urban spaces, modern health care services evolved. Hospitals, educational institutions, research institutes, and professional organizations all dominated the medical systems of urban Canada. After World War II, more and more of those ser- vices were funded by Canada’s federal government, especially when the federally funded program of 1968 called Medicare provided universal health insurance to all citizens. Medicare remains http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Guest Editor’s Note

Nursing History Review , Volume 21 (1): 4 – Jan 1, 2013

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.21.76
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ACCOUNTING FOR THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME-PLACE, WORKPLACE, LANDSCAPE, AND IDENTITY IN CANADIAN HEALTH CARE SERVICES Here/there. Us/them. City/countryside. Colonizer/colonized. Social relations of space and place—the ways geographic distance and social power are mu- tually constitutive —have animated a rich body of scholarship in Canadian nursing history. The two articles presented in this section add to that scholar- ship in important new ways. Prepared for a panel discussion called “Account- ing For the Importance of Home-place, Workplace, Landscape and Identity in Canadian Health Care Services,” presented at the 2011 Joint Conference of the Canadian Association for the History of Nursing and the Canadian Soci- ety for the History of Medicine, the papers generate a fascinating reevaluation of nurses’ work in rural and northern communities, past and present. Canada was, by 1921, a nation more urban than rural ; and in those urban spaces, modern health care services evolved. Hospitals, educational institutions, research institutes, and professional organizations all dominated the medical systems of urban Canada. After World War II, more and more of those ser- vices were funded by Canada’s federal government, especially when the federally funded program of 1968 called Medicare provided universal health insurance to all citizens. Medicare remains

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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