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From Weakling to Fighter: Changing the Image of Premature Infants

From Weakling to Fighter: Changing the Image of Premature Infants From Weakling to Fighter: Changing the Image of Premature Infants EI.I!.AilU II A. R l·ll>\ Vi llanova Uni\·ersirv In rhe summer of 1933 a visir ro rhe Cenrury of Progress Exposirion in Chicago provided local cirizens and wurists with a vision of the future. When they entered rhe fair grounds along Lake Michigan, the vistas seemed incred ible. The major part of the bir wa> d edicated tO "serious" ed ucationa l and sciencifrc exhibits. Large buildings l.'rectnl w display the creariviry and expertise of scientists and industri ­ alists beckoned. Innovations in areas such as transporrario n, educarion, and commu nicat ion promised people suffering li·om rhe effects of the Great Depres­ sion a berrcr and more lucrar ive ti1 rure. Go ing to the fair was a lso;~ socia l occasion. ~md many vis ired sever,ll rimes over the course of the summer. To fi.1rthu e ncourag.e these vis its, rhe managers of the Cenruty of Progress conrinul'd a loll~sranding rrad irion by erecring an enrerrainmenr area, known as rhe Midwa~·. As \'i,iwrs tirl'd nftht· inrcllecrual pursuits of the rest of the fair, they could escape to rh<: ~ li dway. There rhe ~ights were guaranteed robe http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

From Weakling to Fighter: Changing the Image of Premature Infants

Nursing History Review , Volume 11 (1): 19 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.11.1.109
Publisher site
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Abstract

From Weakling to Fighter: Changing the Image of Premature Infants EI.I!.AilU II A. R l·ll>\ Vi llanova Uni\·ersirv In rhe summer of 1933 a visir ro rhe Cenrury of Progress Exposirion in Chicago provided local cirizens and wurists with a vision of the future. When they entered rhe fair grounds along Lake Michigan, the vistas seemed incred ible. The major part of the bir wa> d edicated tO "serious" ed ucationa l and sciencifrc exhibits. Large buildings l.'rectnl w display the creariviry and expertise of scientists and industri ­ alists beckoned. Innovations in areas such as transporrario n, educarion, and commu nicat ion promised people suffering li·om rhe effects of the Great Depres­ sion a berrcr and more lucrar ive ti1 rure. Go ing to the fair was a lso;~ socia l occasion. ~md many vis ired sever,ll rimes over the course of the summer. To fi.1rthu e ncourag.e these vis its, rhe managers of the Cenruty of Progress conrinul'd a loll~sranding rrad irion by erecring an enrerrainmenr area, known as rhe Midwa~·. As \'i,iwrs tirl'd nftht· inrcllecrual pursuits of the rest of the fair, they could escape to rh<: ~ li dway. There rhe ~ights were guaranteed robe

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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