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Florence Nightingale’s Nursing Practice

Florence Nightingale’s Nursing Practice P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-04 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:4 ARTICLES Joyce Schroeder MacQueen Laurentian University Why is the woman who is credited as the founder of modern nursing considered by many scholars not to have actually nursed after her return from the Crimea? This article examines the ways Florence Nightingale’s nursing has been depre- cated or ignored in the literature and tries to redress this failure by uncovering Nightingale’s nursing practice in the 1870s, 1880s, and into the 1890s. I examine her nursing as provided to Holloway villagers, cottagers on the Lea Hurst prop- erty, employees at Lea Hurst and Claydon, and members of her extended family. I also argue that her concern for the health of the Lea Hurst/Holloway people and her beliefs about nursing caused her to initiate reform of nursing at the Buxton Hospital, where her patients were admitted. The situation in Buxton in 1878 and 1879 provides an interesting example of Nightingale’s reform modus operandi. Florence Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy, on May 12, 1820, while her parents were on an extended honeymoon. Her sister, Parthenope, had been born in Naples a year earlier. Obviously, her parents, Frances and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Florence Nightingale’s Nursing Practice

Nursing History Review , Volume 15 (1): 21 – Sep 1, 2007

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.15.29
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-04 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:4 ARTICLES Joyce Schroeder MacQueen Laurentian University Why is the woman who is credited as the founder of modern nursing considered by many scholars not to have actually nursed after her return from the Crimea? This article examines the ways Florence Nightingale’s nursing has been depre- cated or ignored in the literature and tries to redress this failure by uncovering Nightingale’s nursing practice in the 1870s, 1880s, and into the 1890s. I examine her nursing as provided to Holloway villagers, cottagers on the Lea Hurst prop- erty, employees at Lea Hurst and Claydon, and members of her extended family. I also argue that her concern for the health of the Lea Hurst/Holloway people and her beliefs about nursing caused her to initiate reform of nursing at the Buxton Hospital, where her patients were admitted. The situation in Buxton in 1878 and 1879 provides an interesting example of Nightingale’s reform modus operandi. Florence Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy, on May 12, 1820, while her parents were on an extended honeymoon. Her sister, Parthenope, had been born in Naples a year earlier. Obviously, her parents, Frances and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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