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Experience Offsets and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce

Experience Offsets and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce CHAPTER 9 Experience Offsets and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce Joel M. Haight and Toni P. Miles In a highly productive manufacturing world, efficiency and minimization of er- rors is a critical requirement. We also are experiencing an increasing number of older workers in our highly productive manufacturing environments. Accord- ing to the current demographic trends, by the year 2030 approximately 42% of the U.S. population will be more than 45 years old (American Association of Retired Persons, 1990). This is while those in all other age groups (25–34 years, 35–44 years, and 45–54 years) will experience a decrease. We need to develop an understanding of the potential impact of age-related loss of physical and cognitive capacity on error and injury rates associated with the workplace. It is well documented in the research literature that we all experience physical and cognitive losses as we age. We may then intuitively expect that, because of this, we would see higher error rates, higher injury rates, and lower productivity from our older workers. However, research does not sup- port this intuition. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that in 2002, the 25- to 54-year-old age group made up about 76% of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Experience Offsets and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.147
Publisher site
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Abstract

CHAPTER 9 Experience Offsets and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce Joel M. Haight and Toni P. Miles In a highly productive manufacturing world, efficiency and minimization of er- rors is a critical requirement. We also are experiencing an increasing number of older workers in our highly productive manufacturing environments. Accord- ing to the current demographic trends, by the year 2030 approximately 42% of the U.S. population will be more than 45 years old (American Association of Retired Persons, 1990). This is while those in all other age groups (25–34 years, 35–44 years, and 45–54 years) will experience a decrease. We need to develop an understanding of the potential impact of age-related loss of physical and cognitive capacity on error and injury rates associated with the workplace. It is well documented in the research literature that we all experience physical and cognitive losses as we age. We may then intuitively expect that, because of this, we would see higher error rates, higher injury rates, and lower productivity from our older workers. However, research does not sup- port this intuition. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows that in 2002, the 25- to 54-year-old age group made up about 76% of

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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