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Eleanor Clarke Slagle and Susan E. Tracy: Personal and Professional Identity and the Development of Occupational Therapy in Progressive Era America

Eleanor Clarke Slagle and Susan E. Tracy: Personal and Professional Identity and the Development... Eleanor Clarke Slagle and Susan E. Tracy: Personal and Professional Identity and the Development of Occupational Therapy in Progressive Era America VIRGINIA A. METAXAS Department of History Southern Connecticut State University In March of 1917 the National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy held its organizational meeting in Clifton Springs, New York. Eleanor Clarke Slagle, a mental hygiene activist from Hull House, Chicago, and Susan E. Tracy, a Massachusetts nurse and well-respected author of occupational therapy's first textbook Studits in Invalid Occupation (1910), were rwo of the founders who sought to move occupational therapy from its origins in reform to what Dr. Herbert J. Hall called "a new profession for women." In seeking a unified vision for the field the founding generation took principles and practices from nursing, teaching, medicine, psychiatry, arts and crafts, rehabilitation , self-help, orthopedics, mental hygiene, social work, and more to enrich the depth and breadth of occupational therapy's professional panorama. Yet, drawing from these varied perspectives caused problems. Because the first generation of occupational therapists came from various professional fields or, more accurately, from several professions-in-the-making, they found it difficult to create a concise body of knowledge, authority, and identity in the early http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Eleanor Clarke Slagle and Susan E. Tracy: Personal and Professional Identity and the Development of Occupational Therapy in Progressive Era America

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 32 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.39
Publisher site
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Abstract

Eleanor Clarke Slagle and Susan E. Tracy: Personal and Professional Identity and the Development of Occupational Therapy in Progressive Era America VIRGINIA A. METAXAS Department of History Southern Connecticut State University In March of 1917 the National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy held its organizational meeting in Clifton Springs, New York. Eleanor Clarke Slagle, a mental hygiene activist from Hull House, Chicago, and Susan E. Tracy, a Massachusetts nurse and well-respected author of occupational therapy's first textbook Studits in Invalid Occupation (1910), were rwo of the founders who sought to move occupational therapy from its origins in reform to what Dr. Herbert J. Hall called "a new profession for women." In seeking a unified vision for the field the founding generation took principles and practices from nursing, teaching, medicine, psychiatry, arts and crafts, rehabilitation , self-help, orthopedics, mental hygiene, social work, and more to enrich the depth and breadth of occupational therapy's professional panorama. Yet, drawing from these varied perspectives caused problems. Because the first generation of occupational therapists came from various professional fields or, more accurately, from several professions-in-the-making, they found it difficult to create a concise body of knowledge, authority, and identity in the early

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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