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Editorial

Editorial The contributors are rushing to put the finishing touches on their articles while we, here in NHR's editorial office, assemble the completed manu­ script, photographs, drawings, and other material to send to Penn Press. I keep recalling the refrain on the last page of A. A. Milne's Now We Are Six, which begins, 'When I was One I had just begun. When I was Two I was new."* With just two volumes Nursing History Review is truly "nearly nearly new." But the range and quality of historical scholarship in our field is affirmed by the articles and reviews you will find again this year. I commend them to you. Read Diane Hamilton and Victoria Slater as they dissect the intellec­ tual and philosophical foundations of modern nursing- while Sandra Lewenson and Ruth Malone assess the social and political strategies and struggles of professionalizing women. Susan Smith finds entirely new historical territory in the public health history of the American South, while Linda Walsh analyzes the real lives of midwives in urban practice in a northern American city. Quincealea Brunk restores to our collective mem­ ory the nineteenth-century Civil War nurses who invented nursing as we came to know it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The contributors are rushing to put the finishing touches on their articles while we, here in NHR's editorial office, assemble the completed manu­ script, photographs, drawings, and other material to send to Penn Press. I keep recalling the refrain on the last page of A. A. Milne's Now We Are Six, which begins, 'When I was One I had just begun. When I was Two I was new."* With just two volumes Nursing History Review is truly "nearly nearly new." But the range and quality of historical scholarship in our field is affirmed by the articles and reviews you will find again this year. I commend them to you. Read Diane Hamilton and Victoria Slater as they dissect the intellec­ tual and philosophical foundations of modern nursing- while Sandra Lewenson and Ruth Malone assess the social and political strategies and struggles of professionalizing women. Susan Smith finds entirely new historical territory in the public health history of the American South, while Linda Walsh analyzes the real lives of midwives in urban practice in a northern American city. Quincealea Brunk restores to our collective mem­ ory the nineteenth-century Civil War nurses who invented nursing as we came to know it.

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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