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Editorial

Editorial You will fmd carefully resded historical narratives in this volume of N#mi?z~ Histmy Rmim whch span time from 1800 to our own generation and traverse the globe from Canada to China. The word for nursing and its history is "ubiquitous? So, why do we srill meet colleagues who hist that studying history is a waste of time? "History: they say, "is rather nice to know, adds a bit of polish and interest, but it is so impractid." Then they ask, c,How do you expect to get ahead, w get your research funded, to get a job?- What follows is my briefdefenw of our subject. History is our source of identity, our cultural DNA, it affords us collec- tive immortaliry. Hismry yields seE-knowledge by smcturing a mind capa- ble of imagining life beyond one's own lifespan. I-Iistory continuously proposes new ideas, values, and experiences, thus creating and recreating culture and hcipline. History explains connections and patterns among men&. The chronology of history enables historians to interpret events inside cond ha; we, in turn, are able to grasp mq achieve pcrspeaive, and avoid dl-informed or random judgment. History fills our minds, so we enjoy it for its own sake; it helps us gain identity and personal meaning in our work, improves our comprehension and our planning, and validates social criticism. History makes bmer sense of the present and helps us project a more coherent vision of the future. As historian Arthur Schlcsinger put it, %tory supplies the antidote to every generation's illusion that its own problems are uniquely oppressive." Or, you can just show them Volume 4. Center for the Study of rhe Wry of Nursing Univdty of PemylMnia http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Editorial

Nursing History Review , Volume 4 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.4.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

You will fmd carefully resded historical narratives in this volume of N#mi?z~ Histmy Rmim whch span time from 1800 to our own generation and traverse the globe from Canada to China. The word for nursing and its history is "ubiquitous? So, why do we srill meet colleagues who hist that studying history is a waste of time? "History: they say, "is rather nice to know, adds a bit of polish and interest, but it is so impractid." Then they ask, c,How do you expect to get ahead, w get your research funded, to get a job?- What follows is my briefdefenw of our subject. History is our source of identity, our cultural DNA, it affords us collec- tive immortaliry. Hismry yields seE-knowledge by smcturing a mind capa- ble of imagining life beyond one's own lifespan. I-Iistory continuously proposes new ideas, values, and experiences, thus creating and recreating culture and hcipline. History explains connections and patterns among men&. The chronology of history enables historians to interpret events inside cond ha; we, in turn, are able to grasp mq achieve pcrspeaive, and avoid dl-informed or random judgment. History fills our minds, so we enjoy it for its own sake; it helps us gain identity and personal meaning in our work, improves our comprehension and our planning, and validates social criticism. History makes bmer sense of the present and helps us project a more coherent vision of the future. As historian Arthur Schlcsinger put it, %tory supplies the antidote to every generation's illusion that its own problems are uniquely oppressive." Or, you can just show them Volume 4. Center for the Study of rhe Wry of Nursing Univdty of PemylMnia

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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