Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editorial

Editorial Some time ago, a colleague asked me to write a short statem ent discussing the place of historical research in the contemporary nursing research scene. I happily filled her request, citing the intellectual and professional enrichment history offers to nursing. 1 commented on the complementary explanatory power of history in a field dominated by research grounded in the scientific method. When I was finished, 1 filed the paper in my computer under the title "history is good." A slightly whimsical title, I admit. It reflects the frequency with which I am asked to defend history as an appropriate subject for research in nursing. Thinking it over, however, I think we should also ask ourselves "is our history really good?" By this I mean is the history we write good enough to read for fun? Most of us who were educated as health professionals learned to describe our findings using an economy of words yielding an almost terse style. We wrote in the passive voice, never in the first person, and maybe we were even encouraged to use professional and technical jargon. Speaking from experience, I believe convening one' s style from writing this way to writing narrative is very http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/editorial-gzMip4qP8O
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Some time ago, a colleague asked me to write a short statem ent discussing the place of historical research in the contemporary nursing research scene. I happily filled her request, citing the intellectual and professional enrichment history offers to nursing. 1 commented on the complementary explanatory power of history in a field dominated by research grounded in the scientific method. When I was finished, 1 filed the paper in my computer under the title "history is good." A slightly whimsical title, I admit. It reflects the frequency with which I am asked to defend history as an appropriate subject for research in nursing. Thinking it over, however, I think we should also ask ourselves "is our history really good?" By this I mean is the history we write good enough to read for fun? Most of us who were educated as health professionals learned to describe our findings using an economy of words yielding an almost terse style. We wrote in the passive voice, never in the first person, and maybe we were even encouraged to use professional and technical jargon. Speaking from experience, I believe convening one' s style from writing this way to writing narrative is very

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.