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Editorial

Editorial We call our subject the history of nursing. A simple label , perhaps deceptively so. In recent years, the remarkably broad scope of our subject has found, and continues to find, its full expression. I suppose it is no surprise that nursing history reflects the ubiquitousness of our profession and work. It is gratifying, though, to see the inventiveness and diligence of scholars working in the field. As my colleague Parricia D'Antonio puts it, the history of nursing is a very big tent indeed! Look in this issue as the voices and fears of patients and nurses arc resurrected, echoing from the terrifying polio epidemics of the first half of the twentieth century. We read that early nurse specialists, the tuberculosis nurses, could not agree and argued vociferously over best practices in caring for victims of the dread disease. A fascinating examination of blood transfusion reveals new insight into the in tim are relation between nurses and technology and patients. The history of apparel and its design discovers nurses inventing and teaching about new clothing choices and enhancing rhe freedom of women. On the other hand, we find nurses attacking traditional midwives as ignorant competitors, reaping unanticipated and damaging consequences lasting to the present. We look back to the 19th century Victorian sisterhoods to find more innovation and feminine empowerment than is sometimes acknowledged. And, two excellent biographical sketches enrich our comprehension of who nurses really are and how they live their lives. To extend this theme of the "big rent" this issue includes two "Doing the Work of History" contributions. A highly original study of nurses' residences offers us an excellent example of how to use the built enviromenr as a source of historical understanding. Finally, we are reminded that effective coping with technological change is a present day concern for all of us, not just a specialized area of historical study. I want tO take this opportunity to extend thanks to Barbara Brodie, who served as Book Review Editor for Volumes One through Eight. Welcome and thanks to Diane Hamilton, who took up this demanding task, assembling an outstanding group of reviews for Volume Nine. jOAN E. LYNAUGH Center for the Study of the History of Nursing University of Pennsylvania http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Editorial

Nursing History Review , Volume 9 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.9.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We call our subject the history of nursing. A simple label , perhaps deceptively so. In recent years, the remarkably broad scope of our subject has found, and continues to find, its full expression. I suppose it is no surprise that nursing history reflects the ubiquitousness of our profession and work. It is gratifying, though, to see the inventiveness and diligence of scholars working in the field. As my colleague Parricia D'Antonio puts it, the history of nursing is a very big tent indeed! Look in this issue as the voices and fears of patients and nurses arc resurrected, echoing from the terrifying polio epidemics of the first half of the twentieth century. We read that early nurse specialists, the tuberculosis nurses, could not agree and argued vociferously over best practices in caring for victims of the dread disease. A fascinating examination of blood transfusion reveals new insight into the in tim are relation between nurses and technology and patients. The history of apparel and its design discovers nurses inventing and teaching about new clothing choices and enhancing rhe freedom of women. On the other hand, we find nurses attacking traditional midwives as ignorant competitors, reaping unanticipated and damaging consequences lasting to the present. We look back to the 19th century Victorian sisterhoods to find more innovation and feminine empowerment than is sometimes acknowledged. And, two excellent biographical sketches enrich our comprehension of who nurses really are and how they live their lives. To extend this theme of the "big rent" this issue includes two "Doing the Work of History" contributions. A highly original study of nurses' residences offers us an excellent example of how to use the built enviromenr as a source of historical understanding. Finally, we are reminded that effective coping with technological change is a present day concern for all of us, not just a specialized area of historical study. I want tO take this opportunity to extend thanks to Barbara Brodie, who served as Book Review Editor for Volumes One through Eight. Welcome and thanks to Diane Hamilton, who took up this demanding task, assembling an outstanding group of reviews for Volume Nine. jOAN E. LYNAUGH Center for the Study of the History of Nursing University of Pennsylvania

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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