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Editorial

Editorial Zn recent years I have spent a lot of time studying and writing about Ameri- can nursing since Wd War 11. With the perspective of time it seems that nursing is on an ascending track in terms of certain long-held goals. Striv- ing hr better education for nurses, gaining control over nursing pracrice, or comprchendmg the complexities and subtleties of human life-these ambitions are a few steps closer to realization than fifty years ago. As a historian I am indined to believe that, while timing may not be epeytliqg, it is a crucial variable in human &. So you and I are fortunate to 6nd o~vcs living in an age when we can employ the pcrspedvc of at least ISO years of historical information about our subject. The world of health - and nursing is ours to understand and interpkt, Twa simple but wscn- rid ingredient^ for good history are nzrimity and energy, Historical research docs, however, p mke pain because it constantly forces those of us who are both historians and nurses to question our own personal and disciphq assumptions. In this issue of Nwin~ Histoy Ra- view, Mary Carol Ramos offers us a good example of historid rcsmch that penetrates below the rmrface to explore the frustrations, disappoint- ments, and uninmdcd consequcnccs inherent in the one-hundred-year Iong debate about nursing's place in academia. Margarere Sandelowski links history and illuminating concepts &om another field of scholarship to contemplate the vital place of technology in our world. Other authors &pen our understanding of the nineteenth-century world of nursing's origins. Fi five arricl~ and seventy-seven bmk reviews were squeexd be- tween the covers ofthe he N~w~ H&wyRmims published so hr. This work is what we & together. Hkbrical research builds our understandmg of nursing and society; at the same time, it must critique nursing and nur- sing's cherish4 ideas and idols. It is not comfortable bur it is &t boring, either. I look forward to hehg and reading more from each curious and energetic one of you. Center for the Study ofthe History of Nursing University of rcmsyk http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Editorial

Nursing History Review , Volume 5 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.5.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Zn recent years I have spent a lot of time studying and writing about Ameri- can nursing since Wd War 11. With the perspective of time it seems that nursing is on an ascending track in terms of certain long-held goals. Striv- ing hr better education for nurses, gaining control over nursing pracrice, or comprchendmg the complexities and subtleties of human life-these ambitions are a few steps closer to realization than fifty years ago. As a historian I am indined to believe that, while timing may not be epeytliqg, it is a crucial variable in human &. So you and I are fortunate to 6nd o~vcs living in an age when we can employ the pcrspedvc of at least ISO years of historical information about our subject. The world of health - and nursing is ours to understand and interpkt, Twa simple but wscn- rid ingredient^ for good history are nzrimity and energy, Historical research docs, however, p mke pain because it constantly forces those of us who are both historians and nurses to question our own personal and disciphq assumptions. In this issue of Nwin~ Histoy Ra- view, Mary Carol Ramos offers us a good example of historid rcsmch that penetrates below the rmrface to explore the frustrations, disappoint- ments, and uninmdcd consequcnccs inherent in the one-hundred-year Iong debate about nursing's place in academia. Margarere Sandelowski links history and illuminating concepts &om another field of scholarship to contemplate the vital place of technology in our world. Other authors &pen our understanding of the nineteenth-century world of nursing's origins. Fi five arricl~ and seventy-seven bmk reviews were squeexd be- tween the covers ofthe he N~w~ H&wyRmims published so hr. This work is what we & together. Hkbrical research builds our understandmg of nursing and society; at the same time, it must critique nursing and nur- sing's cherish4 ideas and idols. It is not comfortable bur it is &t boring, either. I look forward to hehg and reading more from each curious and energetic one of you. Center for the Study ofthe History of Nursing University of rcmsyk

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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