Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Editor’s Note

Editor’s Note Hiscory maners. ln 1978, a small group of commined individuals fo rmed what was then named the International Hisrory of Nursing Society. Three years later, the newly renamed American Association for the History ofNursing began the annua l meetings rhat have demonstrated, year after year, the vitality and the viability of a historical sensibility in our professional, scholarly, and personal worlds. In 1993, the next piece fdl inro place. Strong leadership and generous member support brought forth rhe first volume of the Nursing Hist01y Review. Under the wise and able edirorship of Joan Lynaugh, rhe Review established irself as the premier inrellecwal medium for the dissemination of the original national and interna­ tional studies, the historiographic essays, comrnenraries, and book reviews that show how and why h isrory marrers. My wish for the Review is that it continue this grand tradition. I hope readers continue ro find within irs pages a compell ing case for the way in which hisrory serves as an overarcbing conceptual framework that allows us ro more fully understand the dispa rate meanings of nursing and the different experiences of nurses. Over the past ten years, the pages of the Review have been filled with the works of scholars exploring the dimensions of this framework. Many of the Reviews contributors, bmh within and outside nursing, trace their own intellecruall ineage, as I do, back w that small 1978 group . We are all truly graceful. The publication of rhe Review, however, would be impossible if nor for rhe dedication and rhe work of others. J remain indebted ro the members of the Edirorial Review Board for rhe hours rhey devore ro the careful assessrnem of manuscripts. I alsn wish to thank those who have, when asked, broughl a parricu lar experrise to the manuscript review process: Evelyn Benson, Barbara Brush, Karen £genes, Elaine Sorenson, Mary Tarbox, and Linda Walsh. And, before you begin your reading, I note that Volume I I marks one other transition. Diane 1-lamilron steps down as Book Review Editor. 1 thank Diane for her service, and join her in thanking all those who contributed to that section. 1 welcome Barbra Mann Wall as rhe new Book Review Ediror. Now, you can begin reading ... PATRICIA D'AN I"ONIO Center for the Study of the History of Nursing University of Pennsylvania http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Editor’s Note

Nursing History Review , Volume 11 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/editor-s-note-9Qg95GZtbu
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.11.1.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hiscory maners. ln 1978, a small group of commined individuals fo rmed what was then named the International Hisrory of Nursing Society. Three years later, the newly renamed American Association for the History ofNursing began the annua l meetings rhat have demonstrated, year after year, the vitality and the viability of a historical sensibility in our professional, scholarly, and personal worlds. In 1993, the next piece fdl inro place. Strong leadership and generous member support brought forth rhe first volume of the Nursing Hist01y Review. Under the wise and able edirorship of Joan Lynaugh, rhe Review established irself as the premier inrellecwal medium for the dissemination of the original national and interna­ tional studies, the historiographic essays, comrnenraries, and book reviews that show how and why h isrory marrers. My wish for the Review is that it continue this grand tradition. I hope readers continue ro find within irs pages a compell ing case for the way in which hisrory serves as an overarcbing conceptual framework that allows us ro more fully understand the dispa rate meanings of nursing and the different experiences of nurses. Over the past ten years, the pages of the Review have been filled with the works of scholars exploring the dimensions of this framework. Many of the Reviews contributors, bmh within and outside nursing, trace their own intellecruall ineage, as I do, back w that small 1978 group . We are all truly graceful. The publication of rhe Review, however, would be impossible if nor for rhe dedication and rhe work of others. J remain indebted ro the members of the Edirorial Review Board for rhe hours rhey devore ro the careful assessrnem of manuscripts. I alsn wish to thank those who have, when asked, broughl a parricu lar experrise to the manuscript review process: Evelyn Benson, Barbara Brush, Karen £genes, Elaine Sorenson, Mary Tarbox, and Linda Walsh. And, before you begin your reading, I note that Volume I I marks one other transition. Diane 1-lamilron steps down as Book Review Editor. 1 thank Diane for her service, and join her in thanking all those who contributed to that section. 1 welcome Barbra Mann Wall as rhe new Book Review Ediror. Now, you can begin reading ... PATRICIA D'AN I"ONIO Center for the Study of the History of Nursing University of Pennsylvania

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.