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Diagnosis of Dementia in the Elderly: A 1980 Perspective

Diagnosis of Dementia in the Elderly: A 1980 Perspective Diagnosis of Dementia in the Elderly: A 1980 Perspective L~ssv F. JARVK, M.D., PH.D. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION MEDICAL CENTER BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA DEPARTM~NT OF PSYCHIATRY AND BIOBEHAV~~RAL SCIBNCES UWRSITY OF CALIFORNU Los ANGELBS, CALIPORNIA According to the Diagnostic and Statisticd Manual of the American Psy- chiatric Association (DSM IIX, January IS, 1978), our diagnostic criteria for dementia include: "A deterioration of previously acquired intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social, ox occupational func- tioning; memory impairment; at least one of the following: impairment of abstract thinking . . . , judgment or impulse control, personality change; [and] . . . evidence . . . of a spedc organic factor that is judged to be etiologically related to the disturbance, in the absence of such evidence, a reasonable presumption of an organic factor based on the exclusion of other conditions." The diagnosis of dementia, then, is based on purely behavioral cri- teria and they, in turn, must lead to a search for etiologic factors. Un- fortunately, there is much confusion in the literature, epidemiological data beihg based on behavioral symptomatology alone in some instsn~s, md on painstaking efforts to distinguish between etiologically distinct categories in others. This confusian is mirrored http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Diagnosis of Dementia in the Elderly: A 1980 Perspective

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.1.1.180
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Diagnosis of Dementia in the Elderly: A 1980 Perspective L~ssv F. JARVK, M.D., PH.D. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION MEDICAL CENTER BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA DEPARTM~NT OF PSYCHIATRY AND BIOBEHAV~~RAL SCIBNCES UWRSITY OF CALIFORNU Los ANGELBS, CALIPORNIA According to the Diagnostic and Statisticd Manual of the American Psy- chiatric Association (DSM IIX, January IS, 1978), our diagnostic criteria for dementia include: "A deterioration of previously acquired intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social, ox occupational func- tioning; memory impairment; at least one of the following: impairment of abstract thinking . . . , judgment or impulse control, personality change; [and] . . . evidence . . . of a spedc organic factor that is judged to be etiologically related to the disturbance, in the absence of such evidence, a reasonable presumption of an organic factor based on the exclusion of other conditions." The diagnosis of dementia, then, is based on purely behavioral cri- teria and they, in turn, must lead to a search for etiologic factors. Un- fortunately, there is much confusion in the literature, epidemiological data beihg based on behavioral symptomatology alone in some instsn~s, md on painstaking efforts to distinguish between etiologically distinct categories in others. This confusian is mirrored

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1980

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