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Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics

Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics 240 Book Reviews Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics By Douglas C. Baynton (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2016) (177 pages; $35.00 cloth) The purpose of this book is to explore the influence and impact of disability on the history of immigration and immigration law during the late 1800s through early 1900s. Author Douglas Baynton, a professor of history who writes exten- sively on disability in history with an emphasis on deaf studies, notes that his - torians have focused on the influences of race and ethnicity but have neglected to analyze the role that disability and the perception of “differentness” played during the time covered in this book. The topic of immigration and disability has been a more recent focus for this author, and I would add that the lessons from a century ago apply to the present time and therefore, this book is timely. Baynton divides the book into four chapters entitled “Defective,” “Handicapped,” “Dependent,” and “Ugly.” He has researched each of these chapters well and provided a sociomedical historical overview and ample primary examples to illustrate his points. Early in the book Baynton states, “The question was not merely whether http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics

Nursing History Review , Volume 26 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.26.1.240
Publisher site
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Abstract

240 Book Reviews Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics By Douglas C. Baynton (Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press, 2016) (177 pages; $35.00 cloth) The purpose of this book is to explore the influence and impact of disability on the history of immigration and immigration law during the late 1800s through early 1900s. Author Douglas Baynton, a professor of history who writes exten- sively on disability in history with an emphasis on deaf studies, notes that his - torians have focused on the influences of race and ethnicity but have neglected to analyze the role that disability and the perception of “differentness” played during the time covered in this book. The topic of immigration and disability has been a more recent focus for this author, and I would add that the lessons from a century ago apply to the present time and therefore, this book is timely. Baynton divides the book into four chapters entitled “Defective,” “Handicapped,” “Dependent,” and “Ugly.” He has researched each of these chapters well and provided a sociomedical historical overview and ample primary examples to illustrate his points. Early in the book Baynton states, “The question was not merely whether

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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