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Dead or Alive: HIPAA’s Impact on Nursing Historical Research

Dead or Alive: HIPAA’s Impact on Nursing Historical Research Dead or Alive: HIPM's Impact on Nursing Historical Research BRIGID LUSK Northern Illinois University SUSAN SACHAK\KI Northwestern Memorial Hospital Archives Access to patienr information is integral to nursing historical research; the essential work ofnurses cannot be separatad from patient care. Yet the 1996 Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance PorcabiIiry and Accountability Act (HIPAA), places new barriers between nurse historians and archival resources. HIPAA's principle of patient confidentiality places often onerous new resrrictions on access to patienr records, whether from 200 years ago or from yesterday, whether patients are dead or alive. HIPAA also appreciably increases the workload and the responsibilities of medid archivisn, underscored by their awareness that infractions may result in signifimnt penalties for researchers and institutions alike. The broad and complex HIPAA privacy rule has undoubtedly led to some medical archives closing all or part oftheir collections in order 10 adhere to the letter ofrhe law and avoid rhe stress and expense of compliance. Collecting instituuons may refuse to accept rnaterrals with identi+ing patienr information. At worsr, institutions might simply destroy documenrswirh identifying patient informarion rather than preserve them fortheir intrinsic value and deal with the implications of access under HIPAA. This inexpensive and expedient response http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Dead or Alive: HIPAA’s Impact on Nursing Historical Research

Nursing History Review , Volume 13 (1): 9 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.13.1.189
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dead or Alive: HIPM's Impact on Nursing Historical Research BRIGID LUSK Northern Illinois University SUSAN SACHAK\KI Northwestern Memorial Hospital Archives Access to patienr information is integral to nursing historical research; the essential work ofnurses cannot be separatad from patient care. Yet the 1996 Privacy Rule of the Health Insurance PorcabiIiry and Accountability Act (HIPAA), places new barriers between nurse historians and archival resources. HIPAA's principle of patient confidentiality places often onerous new resrrictions on access to patienr records, whether from 200 years ago or from yesterday, whether patients are dead or alive. HIPAA also appreciably increases the workload and the responsibilities of medid archivisn, underscored by their awareness that infractions may result in signifimnt penalties for researchers and institutions alike. The broad and complex HIPAA privacy rule has undoubtedly led to some medical archives closing all or part oftheir collections in order 10 adhere to the letter ofrhe law and avoid rhe stress and expense of compliance. Collecting instituuons may refuse to accept rnaterrals with identi+ing patienr information. At worsr, institutions might simply destroy documenrswirh identifying patient informarion rather than preserve them fortheir intrinsic value and deal with the implications of access under HIPAA. This inexpensive and expedient response

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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