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Dazzling Visions: American Women, Race, and the Imperialist Origins of Modern Nursing in Cuba, 1898–1916

Dazzling Visions: American Women, Race, and the Imperialist Origins of Modern Nursing in Cuba,... Dazzling Visions: American Women, Race, and the Imperialist Origins of Modern Nursing in Cuba, 1898–1916 Laura R. Prieto Simmons College A photograph published in the American Journal of Nursing in 1902 shows five women in white uniforms and nurses’ caps. Although the women are gathered outdoors, the caption identifies this as a moment “during class-hour” at the “Training-School for Nurses, Matanzas, Cuba. The gr ”oup portrait is clearly a staged shot rather than a moment arrested in time. The three women seated at the table hold open books, as one might deem appropriate for students. One has what is clearly a human anatomy textbook, with vivid depictions of the skeletal system and digestive tract. Yet none of the women are looking at the pages. One nurse stands beside the others, staring directly at the camera with unsmiling purposefulness. The others, serene and demure, gaze off to the side. They are demonstratively feminine as well as professional. Their full white skirts rhyme with the embroidered white tablecloth in the center of the photograph. Indeed, the iron fence behind the women suggests the clois - tered Spanish domesticity from which they have been released by preparing to become nurses. This image http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Dazzling Visions: American Women, Race, and the Imperialist Origins of Modern Nursing in Cuba, 1898–1916

Nursing History Review , Volume 26 (1): 22 – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.26.1.116
Publisher site
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Abstract

Dazzling Visions: American Women, Race, and the Imperialist Origins of Modern Nursing in Cuba, 1898–1916 Laura R. Prieto Simmons College A photograph published in the American Journal of Nursing in 1902 shows five women in white uniforms and nurses’ caps. Although the women are gathered outdoors, the caption identifies this as a moment “during class-hour” at the “Training-School for Nurses, Matanzas, Cuba. The gr ”oup portrait is clearly a staged shot rather than a moment arrested in time. The three women seated at the table hold open books, as one might deem appropriate for students. One has what is clearly a human anatomy textbook, with vivid depictions of the skeletal system and digestive tract. Yet none of the women are looking at the pages. One nurse stands beside the others, staring directly at the camera with unsmiling purposefulness. The others, serene and demure, gaze off to the side. They are demonstratively feminine as well as professional. Their full white skirts rhyme with the embroidered white tablecloth in the center of the photograph. Indeed, the iron fence behind the women suggests the clois - tered Spanish domesticity from which they have been released by preparing to become nurses. This image

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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