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Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth, By Wendy Kline

Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth, By Wendy Kline Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth BOOK REVIEWS By Wendy Kline (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019) (243 pages; $25.53 hardcover; $14.39 electronic) In Coming Home, medical historian Wendy Kline explores the pathways and places that shaped the profession of midwifery in the United States in the late twentieth century. She offers the history of a “quiet revolution” away from medicalized childbirth toward unlicensed midwifery care at home. Kline tells the story of the midwives that sought to make homebirth mainstream in the 1970s and how they changed birth despite lacking formal education, regula- tion, and role models. She illuminates the attitudes, power dynamics, pri- vacy issues, and sexuality that accompanied the homebirth movement. In her detailed descriptions of midwives and homebirth in Chicago, Washington, DC, Tennessee, and California, Kline highlights the professionalization and education of nonnurse midwives culminating in the creation of the Midwives Association of North America (MANA). Coming Home shines a light on mid- wifery’s past, providing context for current recommendations for integrating midwifery into healthcare systems. Along with a history of midwifery and homebirth, Kline gives an overview of reproductive rights in the United States and challenges common assumptions surrounding birth and midwifery. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth, By Wendy Kline

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 2 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coming Home: How Midwives Changed Birth BOOK REVIEWS By Wendy Kline (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019) (243 pages; $25.53 hardcover; $14.39 electronic) In Coming Home, medical historian Wendy Kline explores the pathways and places that shaped the profession of midwifery in the United States in the late twentieth century. She offers the history of a “quiet revolution” away from medicalized childbirth toward unlicensed midwifery care at home. Kline tells the story of the midwives that sought to make homebirth mainstream in the 1970s and how they changed birth despite lacking formal education, regula- tion, and role models. She illuminates the attitudes, power dynamics, pri- vacy issues, and sexuality that accompanied the homebirth movement. In her detailed descriptions of midwives and homebirth in Chicago, Washington, DC, Tennessee, and California, Kline highlights the professionalization and education of nonnurse midwives culminating in the creation of the Midwives Association of North America (MANA). Coming Home shines a light on mid- wifery’s past, providing context for current recommendations for integrating midwifery into healthcare systems. Along with a history of midwifery and homebirth, Kline gives an overview of reproductive rights in the United States and challenges common assumptions surrounding birth and midwifery. The

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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