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Chinese Kinship and the State: Shaping of Policy for the Elderly

Chinese Kinship and the State: Shaping of Policy for the Elderly CHAPTER 6 Chinese Kinship and the State: Shaping of Policy for the Elderly CHARLDrre lKELS DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY During the course of the past 20 years I have had the opportunity to study Chinese families and Chinese elderly in three different societies: Hong Kong. the United States, and the People's Republic of China (lkels. 1975. 1978, 1980, 1983a, 1983b, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990a, 1990b, 199Oc, 1991, 1992, 1993; Ikcls ct aI., 1992; Keith. Fry. & Iklcs, 1990). What has struck me in all three settings is the dynamic interplay among kinship norms, political ideology, and economic resources thai determines the particular mix of policies and programs each society develops for its elderly. In this chapter I first describe Chinese kinship norms and how they are operationalized in each of the three settings, and then discuss the ideological and economic variables relevant for policy formulation. CHINESE KINSHIP NORMS Any generalized description of Chinese kinship norms must of necessity under­ state the facls of both historical and regional variation. What is presented here should be understood as an effort to describe the norms and to a lesser extent the praxis of Chinese kinship in the early http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Chinese Kinship and the State: Shaping of Policy for the Elderly

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 13 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.13.1.123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 6 Chinese Kinship and the State: Shaping of Policy for the Elderly CHARLDrre lKELS DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY During the course of the past 20 years I have had the opportunity to study Chinese families and Chinese elderly in three different societies: Hong Kong. the United States, and the People's Republic of China (lkels. 1975. 1978, 1980, 1983a, 1983b, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990a, 1990b, 199Oc, 1991, 1992, 1993; Ikcls ct aI., 1992; Keith. Fry. & Iklcs, 1990). What has struck me in all three settings is the dynamic interplay among kinship norms, political ideology, and economic resources thai determines the particular mix of policies and programs each society develops for its elderly. In this chapter I first describe Chinese kinship norms and how they are operationalized in each of the three settings, and then discuss the ideological and economic variables relevant for policy formulation. CHINESE KINSHIP NORMS Any generalized description of Chinese kinship norms must of necessity under­ state the facls of both historical and regional variation. What is presented here should be understood as an effort to describe the norms and to a lesser extent the praxis of Chinese kinship in the early

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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