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Cell Aging

Cell Aging This review of cell aging (cytugerontoIogy) is not intended to provide exhaustive coverage of this burgeoning field. Instead, it represents a discussion of selected areas that either have not been covered in another review (Hayflick, 1977a) or that have enjoyed signi6cant developments or increased interest ia. the last five years. In addition to this review, other recent sweys of this field should be consulted (Martin, 1977% 1977b; Macieira-Coelho, 1973; Rosen, 1978; Hayflick, 1976). The study of cellular age changes in vertebrates is a relatively rant discipline. In spite of this, a considerable amount of information has been obtaiued which is attributable, substantially, to the utilization of in vitro cell culture techniques. The observation that has probably provided the major impetus has been the finding that cultured normal human cells have a finite capacity to replicate and the interpretation that this is an age related phenomenon (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961 ; Haflck, 1965). This interpretation has been the subject of much debate and some con- This work waa supported, in part, by Contract NAS2-9658 from the National Aero- ~ntics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and by Grant AG WB50 from the National Advisory Council on Aging, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.1.1.26
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This review of cell aging (cytugerontoIogy) is not intended to provide exhaustive coverage of this burgeoning field. Instead, it represents a discussion of selected areas that either have not been covered in another review (Hayflick, 1977a) or that have enjoyed signi6cant developments or increased interest ia. the last five years. In addition to this review, other recent sweys of this field should be consulted (Martin, 1977% 1977b; Macieira-Coelho, 1973; Rosen, 1978; Hayflick, 1976). The study of cellular age changes in vertebrates is a relatively rant discipline. In spite of this, a considerable amount of information has been obtaiued which is attributable, substantially, to the utilization of in vitro cell culture techniques. The observation that has probably provided the major impetus has been the finding that cultured normal human cells have a finite capacity to replicate and the interpretation that this is an age related phenomenon (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961 ; Haflck, 1965). This interpretation has been the subject of much debate and some con- This work waa supported, in part, by Contract NAS2-9658 from the National Aero- ~ntics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and by Grant AG WB50 from the National Advisory Council on Aging,

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1980

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