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Carrying Ointments and Even Pills! Medicines in the Work of Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurses, 1893–1944

Carrying Ointments and Even Pills! Medicines in the Work of Henry Street Settlement Visiting... ARTICLES “Carrying Ointments and Even Pills!” Medicines in the Work of Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurses, 1893–1944 ARLENE W. KEELING The University of Virginia School of Nursing We turned into Sufolk Street and walked south several blocks. . . . The tenement was an uncommonly clean one . . . the sickroom was crowded with sympathetic neigh- bors. . . . The first case was a four year old girl with grave pneumonia. She was at a stage of the disease where absolute quiet would have been demanded in the hospital. The sight of the nurse was the signal for a weak scream and a wailing that never ceased until the nurse finished her work. . . . Meanwhile the nurse, calm and un- ruffled, bathed the sick child, rubbed its hot little body with alcohol, remade the bed and administered medicines and a half glass of milk. The child took the medicines and the nourishment, too terrified to resist. She had refused them from the hand of the mother. Sufolk Street, on the Lower East Side of New York City, was in the heart of the tenement district inhabited by German, Polish, Greek, Italian, and Irish immigrants in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Carrying Ointments and Even Pills! Medicines in the Work of Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurses, 1893–1944

Nursing History Review , Volume 14 (1): 24 – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.14.7
Publisher site
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Abstract

ARTICLES “Carrying Ointments and Even Pills!” Medicines in the Work of Henry Street Settlement Visiting Nurses, 1893–1944 ARLENE W. KEELING The University of Virginia School of Nursing We turned into Sufolk Street and walked south several blocks. . . . The tenement was an uncommonly clean one . . . the sickroom was crowded with sympathetic neigh- bors. . . . The first case was a four year old girl with grave pneumonia. She was at a stage of the disease where absolute quiet would have been demanded in the hospital. The sight of the nurse was the signal for a weak scream and a wailing that never ceased until the nurse finished her work. . . . Meanwhile the nurse, calm and un- ruffled, bathed the sick child, rubbed its hot little body with alcohol, remade the bed and administered medicines and a half glass of milk. The child took the medicines and the nourishment, too terrified to resist. She had refused them from the hand of the mother. Sufolk Street, on the Lower East Side of New York City, was in the heart of the tenement district inhabited by German, Polish, Greek, Italian, and Irish immigrants in

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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