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Caring without Politics: Lessons from the First Nurses of the North and South

Caring without Politics: Lessons from the First Nurses of the North and South Caring without Politics: Lessons from the First Nurses of the North and South QUINCBALBA BRUNK The University of Alabama School of Nursing The University of Alabama at Birmingham When the Civil War broke out in 1861, no one anticipated the response to a call for volunteers to serve in the military to come from women. A woman's sphere was clearly designated to be the home during the antebellum years, and society expected this separatist philosophy of gender roles to hold true in wartime as well. However, shortly after the firing on Fort Sumter and President Lincoln's call for volunteers, the women of both the North and the South took it upon themselves to answer a unique call to duty. They sensed the need to care for the sick and wounded long before the military hospital system was well established and took their monopoly of knowl­ edge about caring for the sick to those who needed it most. The United States Sanitary Commission and local Ladies' Aid Soci­ eties began relief work in the North as soon as the war broke out, but indi­ vidual women took on the responsibility of nursing the sick and wounded soldiers. From the beginning, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Caring without Politics: Lessons from the First Nurses of the North and South

Nursing History Review , Volume 2 (1): 18 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Caring without Politics: Lessons from the First Nurses of the North and South QUINCBALBA BRUNK The University of Alabama School of Nursing The University of Alabama at Birmingham When the Civil War broke out in 1861, no one anticipated the response to a call for volunteers to serve in the military to come from women. A woman's sphere was clearly designated to be the home during the antebellum years, and society expected this separatist philosophy of gender roles to hold true in wartime as well. However, shortly after the firing on Fort Sumter and President Lincoln's call for volunteers, the women of both the North and the South took it upon themselves to answer a unique call to duty. They sensed the need to care for the sick and wounded long before the military hospital system was well established and took their monopoly of knowl­ edge about caring for the sick to those who needed it most. The United States Sanitary Commission and local Ladies' Aid Soci­ eties began relief work in the North as soon as the war broke out, but indi­ vidual women took on the responsibility of nursing the sick and wounded soldiers. From the beginning,

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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