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Caring for Life: Nursing During the Holocaust

Caring for Life: Nursing During the Holocaust BARBARA L. BRUSH Boston College School of Nursing T his paper examines the experiences of Jewish nurses incarcerated in ghettos and concentration camps during the Holocausr. It explores their understanding and interpretation of nursing care during this period and how altered standards of care affected nurses and their patients, both victims of the brutal and inhumane circumstances imposed by their Nazi captors. Focusing on an extreme example of rhe shi fting meaning of nursing care, the paper raises broader questions about the preservation of human dignity and human rights under circumstances th at are anrithetica l co nurse t raining and practice principles. Oral and w ritten testimonies of Jewish nurses were collected and analyzed within the broader context of H olocaust h istoriography. Most of the oral testimo­ nies used in this paper were housed in rhe FortunoffVideo Archive for Holocaust Testimony at Yale University and were recorded berween 1984 and 1994, a period that coincides with the develop mem of many commemorative programs for Holocaust survivors. Thus, nurses' testimonies were prepared as part of a larger commitment m preserve Holocaust history, and not specifical ly to highlight nursing and health care conditions and experien ces. Of course. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Caring for Life: Nursing During the Holocaust

Nursing History Review , Volume 10 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.10.1.69
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BARBARA L. BRUSH Boston College School of Nursing T his paper examines the experiences of Jewish nurses incarcerated in ghettos and concentration camps during the Holocausr. It explores their understanding and interpretation of nursing care during this period and how altered standards of care affected nurses and their patients, both victims of the brutal and inhumane circumstances imposed by their Nazi captors. Focusing on an extreme example of rhe shi fting meaning of nursing care, the paper raises broader questions about the preservation of human dignity and human rights under circumstances th at are anrithetica l co nurse t raining and practice principles. Oral and w ritten testimonies of Jewish nurses were collected and analyzed within the broader context of H olocaust h istoriography. Most of the oral testimo­ nies used in this paper were housed in rhe FortunoffVideo Archive for Holocaust Testimony at Yale University and were recorded berween 1984 and 1994, a period that coincides with the develop mem of many commemorative programs for Holocaust survivors. Thus, nurses' testimonies were prepared as part of a larger commitment m preserve Holocaust history, and not specifical ly to highlight nursing and health care conditions and experien ces. Of course.

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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