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Brilliance and Bureaucracy: Nursing and Changes in the Rockefeller Foundation, 1915–1930

Brilliance and Bureaucracy: Nursing and Changes in the Rockefeller Foundation, 1915–1930 Brilliance and Bureaucracy Nursing and Changes in the Rockefeller Foundation, 1915-1930 SARAH E. ABRAMS School of Nursing University of California, San Francisco "Are fbundations showing the imagination and ~e~~urcefihess on social issues that their founders showed in business and that modem sodety so desperately needs?" Edwin R Embree, her officer of the Rockefeller Foundation and president of the Rosenwald Fund, rhetorically posed the question to readers of Hqm AQqmiw in 1949.' It was not the first time he had raised the question; his letters to a dose friend and his earlier publications had time and again described the nature, oppo~es, and pitfalls of foundation giving." Yet, after more than thrrty years in mrpo- rate philanthropy, Embree still appeared uneasy about the gains achieved through foundation giving. He chm- the architects of foundations as men of noble intentions and creative thought, but contidy reiterated his concern that these same foundations entrenched, bureaucramxxl, and professionalized their activities. Rather than search for new but possibly risky projects, foundations for the first time possessed an interest in per- petuating the status quo; this limited the role hey might have played in improving societyetY3 Throughout most of the 19m, Embree dimred the fomdation's nursing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Brilliance and Bureaucracy: Nursing and Changes in the Rockefeller Foundation, 1915–1930

Nursing History Review , Volume 1 (1): 19 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.1.1.119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brilliance and Bureaucracy Nursing and Changes in the Rockefeller Foundation, 1915-1930 SARAH E. ABRAMS School of Nursing University of California, San Francisco "Are fbundations showing the imagination and ~e~~urcefihess on social issues that their founders showed in business and that modem sodety so desperately needs?" Edwin R Embree, her officer of the Rockefeller Foundation and president of the Rosenwald Fund, rhetorically posed the question to readers of Hqm AQqmiw in 1949.' It was not the first time he had raised the question; his letters to a dose friend and his earlier publications had time and again described the nature, oppo~es, and pitfalls of foundation giving." Yet, after more than thrrty years in mrpo- rate philanthropy, Embree still appeared uneasy about the gains achieved through foundation giving. He chm- the architects of foundations as men of noble intentions and creative thought, but contidy reiterated his concern that these same foundations entrenched, bureaucramxxl, and professionalized their activities. Rather than search for new but possibly risky projects, foundations for the first time possessed an interest in per- petuating the status quo; this limited the role hey might have played in improving societyetY3 Throughout most of the 19m, Embree dimred the fomdation's nursing

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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