Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Book Reviews: The Empty Cradle: From Colonial Times to the Present

Book Reviews: The Empty Cradle: From Colonial Times to the Present BOOK REVIEWS The Empty Cradle: From Colonial Times to the Present By Margaret Marsh and Wanda Ronner (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universi tg Press, 1996) Margaret Marsh, a historian, and Wanda Ronner, an obstetrician-gynecolo- gist, are sisters, and the collaborative authors of The Empv Cradle. The book describes the medid and cultural 'frames" that have shaped Americlans' responses to the problem of infertility from colonial days to the prcscnt. Claimed by its authors to be the first book-length history of infertility in the United States, this book offers historical insight into an aspect of the history of reproduction in America that has been neglected. The book is presented chronologically. The first part traces the changing medical and social contexts surrounding infertiliry by examining the terminol- ogy used co identify the problem from colonial days through the 19th century. In the 1700s, the woman who failed to bear children afier marriage was called "barren," and her task was to accept, in sorrow, her fate as displeasure from God. By the middle of the 19th century, spurred by growing medical knowl- edge, infertility had become a ~hysical problem that called for therapeutic intervention. As childless women rurned to physicians, tbe personal misfor- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Book Reviews: The Empty Cradle: From Colonial Times to the Present

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/book-reviews-the-empty-cradle-from-colonial-times-to-the-present-7HgSAuJgox
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS The Empty Cradle: From Colonial Times to the Present By Margaret Marsh and Wanda Ronner (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universi tg Press, 1996) Margaret Marsh, a historian, and Wanda Ronner, an obstetrician-gynecolo- gist, are sisters, and the collaborative authors of The Empv Cradle. The book describes the medid and cultural 'frames" that have shaped Americlans' responses to the problem of infertility from colonial days to the prcscnt. Claimed by its authors to be the first book-length history of infertility in the United States, this book offers historical insight into an aspect of the history of reproduction in America that has been neglected. The book is presented chronologically. The first part traces the changing medical and social contexts surrounding infertiliry by examining the terminol- ogy used co identify the problem from colonial days through the 19th century. In the 1700s, the woman who failed to bear children afier marriage was called "barren," and her task was to accept, in sorrow, her fate as displeasure from God. By the middle of the 19th century, spurred by growing medical knowl- edge, infertility had become a ~hysical problem that called for therapeutic intervention. As childless women rurned to physicians, tbe personal misfor-

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

There are no references for this article.