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Book Reviews: Bargaining for Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876–1938

Book Reviews: Bargaining for Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876–1938 BOOK REVIEWS Bargaining hr Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876-1938 By Barbara Bates (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992) When I first md Barbara Bates's social history of tuberculosis, it was in draft fbm and bow the title "Smrchhg After B1ackbcrries"-a reference to a line in the poem Yohn Brown's Body" by Stephen Vincent Ben& and, more broadIy, to the search oftuberculosis sufferers for a cure. I knew then that the book would find a large audience but that the title would not survive; it would be judged by the marketing department: as %o obscure." As much as I miss the subtleties envclopcd in the working title, I think Bwpini~g fw L@ is better and more appropriate, wmmbg up in a brief phrase MI he essence of the book and, on a more profound level, the experience of disease. In BagainiqgJbrL@ Bates presents two narratives. One is of the life of Dr. Lawrence Flick-himself a suEerer of tuberculosis-who specialized in the treatment of the disease and, more irnporrantly, crusaded on behaof its ~eress. Flick helped inaugurate Pennsylvania's first sanatorium, pushed for the creation of Rush HospitaI for Consumption and Allid Diseases, otganued the Phipps Instimte for the Study, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Book Reviews: Bargaining for Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876–1938

Nursing History Review , Volume 1 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.1.1.247
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Bargaining hr Life: A Social History of Tuberculosis, 1876-1938 By Barbara Bates (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992) When I first md Barbara Bates's social history of tuberculosis, it was in draft fbm and bow the title "Smrchhg After B1ackbcrries"-a reference to a line in the poem Yohn Brown's Body" by Stephen Vincent Ben& and, more broadIy, to the search oftuberculosis sufferers for a cure. I knew then that the book would find a large audience but that the title would not survive; it would be judged by the marketing department: as %o obscure." As much as I miss the subtleties envclopcd in the working title, I think Bwpini~g fw L@ is better and more appropriate, wmmbg up in a brief phrase MI he essence of the book and, on a more profound level, the experience of disease. In BagainiqgJbrL@ Bates presents two narratives. One is of the life of Dr. Lawrence Flick-himself a suEerer of tuberculosis-who specialized in the treatment of the disease and, more irnporrantly, crusaded on behaof its ~eress. Flick helped inaugurate Pennsylvania's first sanatorium, pushed for the creation of Rush HospitaI for Consumption and Allid Diseases, otganued the Phipps Instimte for the Study,

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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