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Blood Work: Canadian Nursing and Blood Transfusion, 1942-1990

Blood Work: Canadian Nursing and Blood Transfusion, 1942-1990 Blood Work Canadian Nursing and Blood Transfusion, 194 2 - 1990 CYNTHIA TOMAN University of Ottawa, School of Nursing Jean Milligan was a new graduate nurse when rhe Onawa Civic Hospital (OCH) became the site of the first regional blood bank for civilians in eastern Canada in 1942. She was on duty the night of the Almonte train disaster on 27 December, just six weeks after the blood bank was established. A military train crashed into the back of a passenger train at rhe small rown located forty-two kilometers west of Ottawa , killing 36 persons and injuring more than 150. Most of rhe victims were admitted to the OCH, where the new transfusion service was used for the first time. Newspapers heralded the role of the hospital and the use of blood as a "life-saving fluid" during the event . Events on the night of 27 December 1942 did nor constitute a "first rime" occurrence or a "great discovery" in the history of blood. Rather, these events illustrated in a very visible and public manner, that blood transfusion technology was now readily available for use in general hospitals. The extension of blood use ro civilian populations would require http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Blood Work: Canadian Nursing and Blood Transfusion, 1942-1990

Nursing History Review , Volume 9 (1): 28 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.9.1.51
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Blood Work Canadian Nursing and Blood Transfusion, 194 2 - 1990 CYNTHIA TOMAN University of Ottawa, School of Nursing Jean Milligan was a new graduate nurse when rhe Onawa Civic Hospital (OCH) became the site of the first regional blood bank for civilians in eastern Canada in 1942. She was on duty the night of the Almonte train disaster on 27 December, just six weeks after the blood bank was established. A military train crashed into the back of a passenger train at rhe small rown located forty-two kilometers west of Ottawa , killing 36 persons and injuring more than 150. Most of rhe victims were admitted to the OCH, where the new transfusion service was used for the first time. Newspapers heralded the role of the hospital and the use of blood as a "life-saving fluid" during the event . Events on the night of 27 December 1942 did nor constitute a "first rime" occurrence or a "great discovery" in the history of blood. Rather, these events illustrated in a very visible and public manner, that blood transfusion technology was now readily available for use in general hospitals. The extension of blood use ro civilian populations would require

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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